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" May it please your majesty, I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak in this place, but as the House is pleased to direct me... "
Famous Sayings and Their Authors: A Collection of Historical Sayings in ... - Page 28
by Edward Latham - 1906 - 318 pages
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The Lives of the Speakers of the House of Commons, from the Time of King ...

James Alexander Manning - Great Britain - 1851 - 496 pages
...whether he saw any of them, and whom they were T Lenthall answered, " May it please your Majesty, I have neither eyes to see nor tongue to speak in this place,...House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here: and humbly beg your Majesty's pardon that I cannot give any other answer than this to what your...
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Lands of the Free: Historical Broadcast Series of the NBC Inter-American ...

NBC University of the Air - America - 1852
...this appeal showed where he felt his allegiance due. "May it please your Majesty," said he, "I have neither " eyes to see nor tongue to speak in this...House is pleased " to direct me, whose servant I am here ; and humbly beg your Majesty's " pardon that I cannot give any other answer than this to what...
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Lord Falkland. Lord Capell

Lady Theresa Lewis - 1852
...this appeal showed where he felt his allegiance due. "May it please your Majesty," said ho, " I have neither " eyes to see nor tongue to speak in this place but as the House is pleased " to direct mo, whose servant I am here ; and humbly beg your Majesty's " pardon that I cannot give any other answer...
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A History of England in the Lives of Englishmen, Volume 2

George Godfrey Cunningham - Great Britain - 1853
...of a precipice, and bearded a lion in his den. " Sir," said the ready and prudent speaker, " I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak in this place,...to direct me, whose servant I am. And I humbly ask your pardon that I cannot give any other answer to what your majesty is pleased to demand of me." But...
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Memorials of the English Affairs from the Beginning of the Reign ..., Volume 1

Bulstrode Whitlocke - Great Britain - 1853
...The ing on his knee, answered the king to this purpose : speaker. MAY IT PLEASE YOUR MAJESTY, I have neither eyes to see nor tongue to speak in this place...house is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here ; and humbly beg your majesty's pardon that I cannot now give any other answer than this to what...
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England & Wales delineated, by T. Dugdale, assisted by W. Burnett ...

Thomas Dugdale - 1854
...delivered up to him, he rose from his chair, and calmly replied : — " May it please your majesty, I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak in this place,...House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here, and humbly beg your majesty's pardon, that I cannot give you any other answer than this, to what...
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History of Charles the first and the English revolution, tr. by A ..., Volume 1

François Pierre G. Guizot - 1854
...they?" The Speaker fell on his knees, and replied — " May it please your Majesty, I have neither eye to see nor tongue to speak in this place, but as the...House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here. And I humbly beg your Majesty's pardon that I cannot now give any. other answer than this to...
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History of Charles the First and the English Revolution: From the ..., Volume 1

François Guizot - Great Britain - 1854 - 430 pages
...they?" The Speaker fell on his knees, and replied — " May it please your Majesty, I have neither eye to see nor tongue to speak in this place, but as the...House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here. And I humbly beg your Majesty's pardon that I cannot now give any other answer than this to what...
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Oliver Cromwell

Francis Lister Hawks - 1856 - 330 pages
...respectfully bending his knee, firmly replied : " I have, sir, neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak jn this place, but as the House is pleased to direct...whose servant I am. And I humbly ask pardon, that I can not give any other answer to what your Majesty is pleased to demand of me." The greatest disorder...
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The Quarterly Review, Volume 99

English literature - 1856
...members were present. Lenthal, thus suddenly interrogated, answered with singular felicity, ' I have neither eyes to see nor tongue to speak in this place, but as the House is pleased to direct me.' Having again looked round, the King said that he perceived the birds had flown, that he only intended...
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