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" May it please your majesty, I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak in this place, but as the House is pleased to direct me... "
Famous Sayings and Their Authors: A Collection of Historical Sayings in ... - Page 28
by Edward Latham - 1906 - 318 pages
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Recollections of the British Institution for Promoting the Fine Arts in the ...

Thomas Smith (Of Mary-le-bone) - Artists - 1860 - 231 pages
...of high treason. The Speaker, falling on his knees, replied, '• May it please your Majesty, I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak, in this...House is pleased to direct me. whose servant I am." This picture is composed from the most authentic portraits of the characters introduced which are now...
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Outlines of English history

Evan Daniel - 1863
...inquired of the Speaker if the persona impeached were present. Lenthal, falling on his knees, replied, " I have, Sir, neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak,...House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am." Charles then exclaimed, " Well, since the birds are flown, I do expect that you will send them to me...
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Outlines of English history

Evan Daniel - 1863
...inquired of the Speaker if the persons impeached were present. Lenthal, falling on his knees, replied, " 1 have, Sir, neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak,...House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am." Charles then exclaimed, " Well, since the birds r.re flown, I do expect that you will send them to...
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Revolutions in English History: Revolutions in government

Robert Vaughan - Great Britain - 1863
...present. That officer, on his knees, delivered himself in very constitutional language : ' Sire—I have neither eyes ' to see, nor tongue to speak in this...house is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am.' Charles expressed his regret that ' the birds had flown,' but added that he intended proceeding according...
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The English Nation; Or, A History of England in the Lives of ..., Volume 2

George Godfrey Cunningham - Great Britain - 1863
...bearded a lion in his den. " Sir," said the ready and prudent speaker, " I have neither eyes to Ree, nor tongue to speak in this place, but as the house...to direct me, whose servant I am. And I humbly ask your pardon that I cannot give any other answer to what your majesty is pleased to demand of me." But...
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The Institutions of the English Government: Being an Account of the ...

Homersham Cox - Constitutional law - 1863 - 757 pages
...its members, and demanding of the Speaker (Lenthall) where they were, the Speaker replied, " I have neither eyes to see nor tongue to speak, in this place,...House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here ; and I humbly beg your Majesty's pardon that I cannot give any other answer than this to what...
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Free Government in England and America: Containing the Great ..., Volume 25

John Fulton - Constitutional history - 1864 - 576 pages
...persons were in the house, and where they were. The speaker, falling on his knees, replied, " I have neither eyes to see nor tongue to speak in this place,...house is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here, and humbly beg your majesty's pardon that I cannot give any other answer than this to what your...
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The Victoria History of England: From the Landing of Julius Caesar, B.C. 54 ...

Arthur Bailey Thompson - Great Britain - 1865 - 723 pages
...where are they ?" The Speaker fell on his knees and exclaimed : " May it please your Majesty, I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak, in this...pleased to direct me, whose servant I am ; and I humbly beg your Majesty's pardon, that I cannot now give any other answer than this to what your Majesty is...
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A Constitutional History of the British Empire: From the Accession of ...

George Brodie - Constitutional history - 1866
...presence of mind on such an unprecedented and critical occasion, ' May it please your majesty, I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak, in this place, but as the House, whose servant I am, is pleased to direct me; and I humbly beg your majesty's pardon, that I cannot...
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A constitutional history of the British empire, Volume 2

George Brodie - 1866
...presence of mind on such an unprecedented and critical occasion, ' May it please your majesty, I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak, in this place, but as the House, whose servant I am, is pleased to direct me; and I humbly beg your majesty's pardon, that I cannot...
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