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" May it please your majesty, I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak in this place, but as the House is pleased to direct me... "
Famous Sayings and Their Authors: A Collection of Historical Sayings in ... - Page 28
by Edward Latham - 1906 - 318 pages
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Biographical Dictionary of Painters, Sculptors, Engravers, and Architects ...

John Gould - Art - 1838
...demanded if Hampden, Pym, Hollis, Hazelrig, and Strode were present, Lenthall, the speaker, replies, " I have, sir, neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak,...place, but as the House is pleased to direct me." The scene is one of deep interest, and the artist has handled it with considerable skill and knowledge....
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The Parliament and Councils of England, Chronologically Arranged: From the ...

Charles Henry Parry - Constitutional history - 1839 - 641 pages
...his Majesty asks the Sneaker where they were ? Falling on his knees, the Speaker answers ; " I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak in this Place,...House is pleased to direct me, whose Servant I am here, and I humbly beg your Majesty's pardon, that I cannot give any other answer than this, to what...
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The History of England, from the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the ..., Volume 5

David Hume - Great Britain - 1841
...whether any of these persons were in the House ? The speaker, falling on his knee, prudently replied : " I have, sir, neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak,...Whose servant I am. And I humbly ask pardon, that CHAP. I cannot give any other answer to what your majesty is pleased to demand of me." " 1642. The...
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Tait's Edinburgh Magazine

William Tait, Christian Isobel Johnstone - 1841
...received the memorable answer from the speaker, Lenthall, so familiar to all English readers — " I have, sir, neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak...House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am," — the king, who had taken the speaker's chair, is thus described : — Stepping down from the chair,...
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Memoirs of the House of Commons : from the Convention Parliament ..., Volume 1

William Charles Townsend - 1844
...up from a life of meanness. His words have become aphoristic : " May it please your majesty, I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak in this place,...House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here ; and humbly beg your majesty's pardon that I cannot give any other answer than this to what your...
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History of the English Revolution of 1640: Commonly Called the Great ...

François Guizot - Great Britain - 1846 - 21 pages
...where are they ?" The speaker, falling on his knees, replied, " May it please your majesty, I have neither eyes to see nor tongue to speak, in this place,...house is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here. And humbly beg your majesty's pardon, that I cannot give any other answer than this to what your...
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The Statesmen of the Commonwealth of England: With a Treatise on ..., Volume 1

John Forster - Great Britain - 1846
...were. To which the speaker, falling on his knee, thus answered : ' May it please your majesty, I have neither eyes to see nor tongue to speak in this place...House is pleased to direct me, •whose servant I am here ; and humbly beg your majesty's pardon that I cannot ,<;ivr any other answer than this to what...
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The Judges of England: With Sketches of Their Lives, and ..., Volume 6

Edward Foss - Courts - 1857
...where they were ? " the speaker, falling on his knees, replied, " May it please your majesty ; I have neither eyes to see nor tongue to speak in this place,...house is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here ; and humbly beg your majesty's pardon that I cannot give any other answer than this to what your...
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The Fairfax Correspondence: vols

Great Britain - 1848
...To which enquiries the Speaker, falling on his knees, answered, " May it please your Majesty, I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak in this place,...House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here ; and I humbly beg your Majesty's pardon that I cannot give any other answer than this to what...
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Elements of History, Ancient and Modern

Joseph Emerson Worcester - History - 1849 - 408 pages
...speaker, Lenthal, TO point them out. " Sir," answered the speaker, falling O'» his knees, " 1 have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak in this place,...I am ; and I humbly ask pardon that I cannot give cny othe/ answer to what your majesty is pleased to demand of me." 18. The king withdrew without effecting...
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