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" May it please your majesty, I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak in this place, but as the House is pleased to direct me... "
Famous Sayings and Their Authors: A Collection of Historical Sayings in ... - Page 28
by Edward Latham - 1906 - 318 pages
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Eminent Serjeants-at-law of the English Bar, Volume 1

Humphry William Woolrych - Biography & Autobiography - 1869 - 917 pages
...them, and where they were. The Speaker, falling on his knee : — " May it please your Majesty, I have neither eyes to see nor tongue to speak in this place,...House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here; and humbly beg your Majesty's 1 Campbell's " Chancellors," vol. iv. p. 39. 2 Parliamentary...
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The Irish and British Wars, 1637-1654: Triumph, Tragedy, and Failure

James Scott Wheeler - History - 2002 - 272 pages
...House.' Lenthall rephed with the famous lmes that 1 have neither eyes to see nor tongue to speak m this place, but as the House is pleased to direct me, whose servant 1 am here: and humbly heg your Majesty's pardon that 1 cannot now give any other answer than this to...
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The Concise Encyclopedia of the Revolutions and Wars of England, Scotland ...

Stephen C. Manganiello - History - 2004 - 613 pages
...the question. The Speaker fell to one knee before him and said, "May it please your Majesty, I have neither eyes to see nor tongue to speak in this place...House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here." The King replied that his eyes were good enough and that he could see his birds had flown. However,...
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The Pocket Book of British Patriotism: The History of Great Britain and the ...

History - 2005 - 64 pages
...ABROAD 1636 Harvard University founded 1637 The Tulip Crash in Holland 7642 Tasmania discovered "I have neither eyes to see nor tongue to speak in this place but as the House is pleased to direct me." Speaker Lenthall "I see the birds have flown." King Charles 1642 Outbreak of Civil War 1642 The Battle...
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Gavel to Gavel: An Insider's View of Parliament

Kevin Rozzoli - History - 2006 - 314 pages
...must take my own course to find them." To which Lenthall replied "May it please Your Majesty, I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak in this place,...House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here." The five men escaped to safety while Speaker Lenthall survived the displeasure of the King....
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An Introduction to the U.S. Congress

Charles Bancroft Cushman - Political Science - 2006 - 229 pages
...English Civil War-era Speaker William Lenthall put it to Charles I: "May it please Your Majesty, I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak in this place,...House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here, and I humbly beg Your Majesty's pardon that I cannot give any other answer than this to what...
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George Goring (1608-1657): Caroline Courtier and Royalist General

Florene S. Memegalos - Biography & Autobiography - 2007 - 422 pages
...the birds have flown," inquired as to their whereabouts, to which Speaker Lenthall replied: "I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak in this place,...House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here ...."' King Charles could only ask for the apprehension of the designated traitors and withdraw....
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