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" May it please your majesty, I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak in this place, but as the House is pleased to direct me... "
Famous Sayings and Their Authors: A Collection of Historical Sayings in ... - Page 28
by Edward Latham - 1906 - 318 pages
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Life of Oliver Cromwell to the death of Charles the first

John Richard Andrews (barrister.) - 1870
...whether he saw any of them, and where they were. The Speaker replied, falling on his knees : ' I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak, in this...place but as the House is pleased to direct me, whose ROYAL INTIMIDATION. 147 servant I am here, and humbly beg your Majesty's pardon that I cannot give...
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The Life of John Milton, Volume 2

David Masson - 1871
...were in the House, and, if so, where. "May it please your Majesty," said Lenthall, kneeling, " I have neither eyes to see nor " tongue to speak in this...House is pleased " to direct me, whose servant I am here ; and I humbly beg " your Majesty's pardon that I cannot give any other answer " than this to...
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The Life of John Milton: Narrated in Connection with the Political ..., Volume 2

David Masson - 1871
...were in the House, and, if so, where. "May it please your Majesty," said Lenthall, kneeling, " I have neither eyes to see nor " tongue to speak in this...House is pleased " to direct me, whose servant I am here ; and I humbly beg " your Majesty's pardon that I cannot give any other answer " than this to...
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ELEMENTS OF HISTORY

JOSEPH E. WORCESTER - 1871
...the speaker Lenthal, to point them out. " Sir," answered the speaker Tailing o*v his knees, " I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak in this place, but as the House is pleased to direct me tfhope servant I am ; and I humbly ask pardon that I cannot give ; ny othey answer to what your majesty...
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Elements of History, Ancient and Modern

Joseph Emerson Worcester - History - 1871 - 437 pages
...speaker Lenlhal, »o point them out. " Sir," answered the speaker ."ailing o>» his knees, " I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak in this place, but as the House is pleased to direct me »rho?e servant I am ; and I humbly ask pardon that I cannot jive lay othe; answer to what your majesty...
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The Student's Hume: A History of England from the Earliest Times to the ...

David Hume - Great Britain - 1872 - 789 pages
...whether any of these persons were in the House. The speaker, falling on his knee, prudently replied, " I have, sir, neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak,...whose servant I am ; and I humbly ask pardon that I can not give any other answer to what your majesty is pleased to demand of me." The king then said...
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The British Constitution and Government: A Description of the Way in which ...

Frederick Wicks - Administrative law - 1872 - 210 pages
...where they were. Upon this the Speaker fell on his knees, and desired excuse, saying :— " I have neither eyes to see nor tongue to speak in this place,...House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here." Then the King told him he thought his own eyes were as good as his, and said his birds had flown,...
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The British constitution and government

Frederick Wicks - Great Britain - 1872 - 210 pages
...where they were. Upon this the Speaker fell on his knees, and desired excuse, saying : — " I have neither eyes to see nor tongue to speak in this place,...House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here." Then the King told him he thought his own eyes were as good as his, and said his birds had flown,...
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Once a Week

Eneas Sweetland Dallas - Art - 1872
...rendering up of the "five members." "May it please your Majesty," said Lenthal, "I have neither eye to see nor tongue to speak in this place, but as the House, whose servant I am, is pleased to direct me." And this is the true explanation of the Speaker's position....
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A History of England from the Earliest Times to the Revolution in 1688 ...

David Hume - Great Britain - 1873 - 789 pages
...whether any of these persons were in the House. The speaker, falling on his knee, prudently replied, " I have, sir, neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak,...whose servant I am ; and I humbly ask pardon that I can not give any other answer to what your majesty is pleased to demand of me." The king then said...
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