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" May it please your majesty, I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak in this place, but as the House is pleased to direct me... "
Famous Sayings and Their Authors: A Collection of Historical Sayings in ... - Page 28
by Edward Latham - 1906 - 318 pages
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The Student's Hume: A History of England from the Earliest Times to the ...

David Hume - Great Britain - 1873 - 789 pages
...whether any of these persons were in the House. The speaker, falling on his knee, prudently replied, " I have, sir, neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak,...whose servant I am; and I humbly ask pardon that I can not give any other answer to what your majesty is pleased to demand of me." The king then said...
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Elements of History, Ancient and Modern

Joseph Emerson Worcester - History - 1873 - 437 pages
...the speaker Lent.hal, TO point them out. " Sir," answered the speaker Tailing o<v his knees, " I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak in this place, but as the House is pleased to direct me ivhofe servant I am ; and I humbly ask pardon that I cannot five any otlie/ answer to what your majesty...
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King and Commonwealth, a history of the Great rebellion [by B.M. Gardiner ...

Bertha Meriton Gardiner - Great Britain - 1874 - 198 pages
...they were. Upon this, the Speaker fell on his knees, and said, 'May it please your Majesty, I have neither eyes to see nor tongue to speak in this place,...House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here, and humbly beg your Majesty's pardon, that I cannot give any other answer than this, to what...
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The Four Civilizations of the World: An Historical Retrospect

Henry Wikoff - Civilization - 1874 - 416 pages
...asked the Speaker if the accused were present. Falling on his knees, the Speaker replied, " I have neither eyes to see nor tongue to speak in this place...House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here, and humbly beg your Majesty's pardon that I cannot give any other answer than this." The House...
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The Century of Revolution, 1603-1714

Christopher Hill - History - 1982 - 296 pages
...1642, when Charles I came to arrest five members of Parliament, Speaker Lenthall said to him, 'I have neither eyes to see nor tongue to speak in this place,...House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am.' So the revolution was completed by which the Speaker ceased to be the King's servant and became the...
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Democratic Legislative Institutions: A Comparative View

David M. Olson - Political Science - 1994 - 184 pages
...whether several members, whom he was going to arrest, were present: "May it please your Majesty, I have neither eyes to see nor tongue to speak in this place, but as the House doth direct me, whose servant I am." Bailey 1971, 62 The very name, "Speaker," illustrates the tortured...
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The Making of the United Kingdom

Robert Unwin - Great Britain - 1996 - 112 pages
...shall send them unto me as soon as they return ... The Speaker: May it please your Majesty, I have neither eyes to see nor tongue to speak in this place, but as the House is pleased to direct me. 1 Look at Source A. The Churchman shown in the pulpit is named in the cartoon. Who is he? What is he...
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UK Government & Politics

Andy Williams - Great Britain - 1998 - 246 pages
...agent of the monarch. This link was not broken until 1642 when Speaker Lenthall told Charles I: 'I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak in this place...House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here.' Since the mid-nineteenth century the Speaker has been seen as a neutral figure. Elected by MPs,...
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The Young Oxford History of Britain & Ireland

Mike Corbishley - Great Britain - 1998 - 416 pages
...were. The Speaker, William Lenthall, knelt respectlully and replied. May it please Your Mafesty, I have neither eyes to see nor tongue to speak in this place, but as this House is pleased to direct me, whose servant 1 am heiv. The king realized he had been outwitted....
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Cromwell, the Lord Protector

Antonia Fraser - Biography & Autobiography - 2001 - 774 pages
...gave the momentous reply, a mixture of reverence and defiance: "May it pleasure your Majesty, I have neither eyes to see nor tongue to speak in this place...House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here . . ,"23 Thus the King departed from the House of Commons and then from London itself, never to...
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