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" May it please your majesty, I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak in this place, but as the House is pleased to direct me... "
Famous Sayings and Their Authors: A Collection of Historical Sayings in ... - Page 28
by Edward Latham - 1906 - 318 pages
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A Complete Collection of State Trials and Proceedings for High ..., Volume 4

Law reports, digests, etc - 1816
...the Speaker, falling on his knee, thai answered : ' May it. please your majesty ; I have nei' ther eyes to see nor tongue to speak in this ' place, but as the house is pleased to direct ' me, nhose servant I am here; and humbly ' beg your majesty's pardon, that I cannot give' any other answer...
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A History of the British Empire: From the Accession of Charles I ..., Volume 3

George Brodie - Great Britain - 1822
...presence of mind on such an unprecedented and critical occasion, " May it please your Majesty, I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak, in this place, but as the house, whose servant 1 am, is pleased to direct me ; and I humbly beg your Majesty's pardon, that I cannot...
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An Account of All the Pictures Exhibited in the Rooms of the British ...

British Institution - Nobility - 1824 - 320 pages
...William Strode. The speaker falling on his knees, replied, •' May it please your Majesty, I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak, in this...House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am." This picture is composed from the most authentic portraits of the characters introduced, which are...
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A biographical history of England, adapted to a methodical catalogue of ...

James Granger - 1824
...whether any of these persons were in the house ? The speaker, falling on his knees, prudently replied, I have, sir, neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak,...this place, but as the House is pleased to direct, whose servant I am ; and I humbly ask pardon that I cannot give any other answer to what your majesty...
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A Biographical History of England: From Egbert the Great to the Revolution ...

James Granger - Great Britain - 1824
...whether any of these persons were in the house ? The speaker, falling on his knees, prudently replied, I have, sir, neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak,...this place, but as the House is pleased to direct, whose servant I am ; and I humbly ask pardon that I cannot give any other answer to what your majesty...
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The History of England, from the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the ..., Volume 6

David Hume - Great Britain - 1825
...whether any of these persons were in the house ? The speaker, falling on his knee, prudently replied ; " I have, sir, neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak,...house is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am. And 1 humbly ask pardon, that I cannot give any other answer to what your majesty is pleased to demand...
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The Lives of the Most Eminent British Painters, Sculptors, and ..., Volume 5

Allan Cunningham - Architects - 1832
...demanded^ if Hampden, Pym, Hollis, Hazelrig, and Strode were present, Lenthall the speaker replies, — "I have, sir, neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak,...place, but as the House is pleased to direct me." The scene is one of deep interest, and the artist has handled it with considerable skill and knowledge....
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The Englishman's magazine [ed. by E. Moxon].

1831
...desired him to excuse his answer, for " in this place I have neither eyes to see nor tongue to speak, but as the house is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am." " The birds then are flown!" said Charles, passionately, and insisting hastily that the accused members...
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Some Memorials of John Hampden, His Party, and His Times, Volume 2

George Nugent Grenville Baron Nugent - Great Britain - 1832
...are well known as being the cause of this memorable reply : —' May it please your ' Majesty, I have neither eyes to see, nor ' tongue to speak, in this...but as the ' House is pleased to direct me, whose ser' vant I am here; and I humbly beg your ' Majesty's pardon that I cannot give any ' other answer...
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The Georgian Era: Political and rural economists. Painters, sculptors ...

Great Britain - 1834 - 588 pages
...if Hampden, 1'ym, Hollie, ! l.-i/.rlii;', and Strode were present, is thus answered by the speaker: "I have, sir, neither eyes to see nor tongue to speak, in this place, but as the bouse is pleased to direct me." A letter from Lord Ferrers, in relation to this picture, is too curious...
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