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" Though fraught with all learning, yet straining his throat, To persuade Tommy Townshend* to lend him a vote ; Who, too deep for his hearers, still went on refining, And thought of convincing, while they thought of -dining. Though equal to all things,... "
Calendar - Page 512
by University of Calcutta - 1908
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The Plain Speaker: Opinions on Books, Men, and Things : in Two Volumes, Volume 2

William Hazlitt - Rationalism - 1826 - 462 pages
...as one who was kept back in his dazzling, wayward career, by the supererogation of his talents — Though equal to all things, for all things unfit, Too nice for a statesman, too proud for a wit. Dr. Johnson, in Boswell's Life, tells us that the only person whose conversation he ever sought for...
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The London encyclopaedia, or, Universal dictionary ..., Part 2; Parts 1945-1948

Thomas Curtis (of Grove house sch, Islington) - 436 pages
...And thought of convincing while they thought of dining ; Though equal to all things, for all thini;* unfit. Too nice for a statesman, too proud for a wit...place, Sir, To eat mutton cold, and cut blocks with a rawr. The entire works of this great man have been published by his executors in 5 vols. 4to., and...
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The Miscellaneous Works of Oliver Goldsmith: With an Account of His Life and ...

Oliver Goldsmith - 1830 - 527 pages
...for his hearers, still went on refin ing, And thought of convincing, while they thought о dining: $! \. a L 1 V - 9z r (bC ,G w unemploy'd or in piafe, sir, To eat mutton cold, and cut blocks with a razor. Here lies honest William,...
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Select British Poets: Containing the Works of Goldsmith, Thomson, Gray ...

Thomas F. Walker - English poetry - 1830 - 240 pages
...for his hearers, still went on refining, And thought of convincing, while they thought of dining : Though equal to all things, for all things unfit ;...too fond of the right to pursue the expedient. In abort, 'twas his fate, unemploy'd, or in place, sir, To eat mutton cold, and cut blocks with a razor....
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Chambers's Cyclopędia of English Literature: A History ..., Volumes 3-4

Robert Chambers - Authors, American - 1830 - 844 pages
...And thought of convincing, while they thought of dining. Though equal to all things, for all tilings t ; lor a drudge disobedient, And too fond of the riijht to pursue the expedient. In short, 'twas his...
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The British Satirist: Comprising the Best Satires of the Most Celebrated ...

Satire, English - 1831 - 792 pages
...deep for his hearers, still went on refining, And thought of convincing, while they thought of dining; Though equal to all things, for all things unfit, Too nice for a stateman, too proud for a wit; For a patriot too cool ; fora drudge, disobedient, And too fond of the...
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The Georgian Era: The royal family. The pretenders and their adherents ...

Great Britain - 1832 - 616 pages
...deep for his hearers, still weut on refining, And thought of convincing, while they thought of dining. Though equal to all things, for all things unfit,...proud for a wit ; For a patriot too cool, for a drudge disobedieut, Aud too fond of the right to pursue the expedieut. In fine, 'twas his fate, nuemploy'd...
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The anniversary calendar, natal book, and universal mirror, Volume 2

Anniversary calendar - 1832 - 600 pages
...for mankind ; Though equal to ill things, for all things unfit; Too nice for a statesman, too prond for a wit ; For a patriot too cool ; for a drudge...fond of the right to pursue the expedient. In short, 't was his forte, unemploy'd, or in place, sir, To eat mutton cold, and cut blocks with a rmar.-- CoUtmith....
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Castle Rackrent ; An Essay on Irish Bulls ; an Essay on the Noble Science of ...

Maria Edgeworth - 1832 - 344 pages
...refining, And thought of convincing, whilst they thought of dining ; In short, 'twas his fate, unemploy'd or in place, sir, To eat mutton cold, and cut blocks with a razor." " What humour and wit there are in that poem of Goldsmith's ! and where is there any thing...
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The Georgian Era: The royal family. The pretenders and their adherents ...

Great Britain - 1832 - 592 pages
...hi* hearers, «till «rent on refining, And thought of ron vi (icing, «hila they (bought of dining. Though equal to all things, for all things unfit, Too nice for ai tainman, too proud fur л wit ; For » patriot too cool, lor a drudge duobedient, And too Tond of...
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