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" Though fraught with all learning, yet straining his throat, To persuade Tommy Townshend* to lend him a vote ; Who, too deep for his hearers, still went on refining, And thought of convincing, while they thought of -dining. Though equal to all things,... "
Calendar - Page 512
by University of Calcutta - 1908
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The Phrenological Journal and Miscellany, Volume 1

Phrenology - 1824
...deep for his hearers, still went on refining, And thought of convincing, when they thought of dining. Though equal to all things — for all things unfit,...place, sir, To eat mutton cold, and cut blocks with a razor. I have said that this description is almost phrenological. It is, at any rate, such as will...
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Memoir of the life and character of ... Edmund Burke; with specimens of his ...

Sir James Prior - 1824 - 618 pages
...for his hearers, still went on refining, And thought of convincing, while they thought of dining ; Though equal to all things, for all things unfit,...to pursue the expedient ; In short, 'twas his fate unemploy'd or in place, Sir, To eat mutton cold, and cut blocks with a razor. Of the lively and affectionate...
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The Poetical Works of John Milton ...

John Milton - 1824 - 131 pages
...too deep for his hearers, still went on reh'nAnd thought of convincing while they thought of dining : Though equal to all things, for all things unfit,...to pursue the expedient. In short, 'twas his fate, unemploy'd, or in place, sir, To eat mutton cold, and cut blocks with a razor. Here lies honest William,!...
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Select British Poets, Or, New Elegant Extracts from Chaucer to the Present ...

William Hazlitt - English poetry - 1824 - 822 pages
...deep for his hearers, still went on refining, And thought of convincing, while they thought of dining; ead. ODE ON THE ПEАTH OF MR. THOMSON. THE SCENE...yonder grave a Druid lies, Where slowly winds the s pnrsue the expedient. In short, 'twas hie fate, unemploy'd, orin place, sir, To eat mutton cold, and...
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Works, Volume 2

Maria Edgeworth - 1824 - 402 pages
...for his hearers, still went on refining, And thought of convincing, whilst they thought of dining, In short 'twas his fate unemployed or in place, sir, To eat mutton cold, and cut blocks with a razor." " What humour and wit there are in that poem of Goldsmith ! and where is there any thing equal...
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The Miscellaneous Works of Oliver Goldsmith: Miscellaneous poems. The good ...

Oliver Goldsmith - English literature - 1825
...for his hearers, still went on refining, And thought of convincing, while they thought of dining : Though equal to all things, for all things unfit,...to pursue the expedient. In short, 'twas his fate, unemploy'd or in place, sir, To eat mutton cold, and cut blocks with a razor. Here lies honest William,...
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Castle Rackrent. Essay on Irish bulls. The modern Griselda. v. II. Belinda ...

Maria Edgeworth - 1825 - 370 pages
...refining, And thought of convincing, whilst they thought of dining ; In short, 'twas his fate, unemploy'd or in place, sir, To eat mutton cold, and cut blocks with a razor." " What humour and wit there are in that poem of Goldsmith's ! and where is there any thing...
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Select Poets of Great Britain: To which are Prefixed, Criticial Notices of ...

William Hazlitt - English poetry - 1825 - 562 pages
...eonvineing, while they thought of dining; Though equal to all things, for all things unfit, Too niee eool ; for a drudge, disobedient ; And too fond of the right to pursue the expedient. In short, 'twas...
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The Plain Speaker: Opinions on Books, Men, and Things, Volume 2

William Hazlitt - Aesthetics - 1826 - 458 pages
...as one who was kept back in his dazzling, wayward career, by the supererogation of his talents — Though equal to all things, for all things unfit, Too nice for a statesman, too proud for a wit. Dr. Johnson, in Boswell's Life, tells us that the only person whose conversation he ever sought for...
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The Plain Speaker: Opinions on Books, Men, and Things, Volume 1

William Hazlitt - 1826 - 447 pages
...as one who was kept back in his dazzling, wayward career, by the supererogation of his talents — Though equal to all things, for all things unfit, Too nice for a statesman, too proud for a wit. ff Dr. Johnson, in Boswell's Life, tells us that the only person whose conversation he ever sought...
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