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" Though fraught with all learning, yet straining his throat, To persuade Tommy Townshend* to lend him a vote ; Who, too deep for his hearers, still went on refining, And thought of convincing, while they thought of -dining. Though equal to all things,... "
Calendar - Page 512
by University of Calcutta - 1908
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The Lounger's Common-place Book: Or, Miscellaneous Anecdotes. A Biographic ...

Jeremiah Whitaker Newman - Anecdotes - 1796 - 296 pages
...his hearers, ftill went, on refining, And thought of convincing, while they thought of dining ; Tho' equal to all things, for all things unfit, Too nice for a ftatelinan, too proud for a wit ; For a patriot too rafh, for a drudge difobedient, And too fond of...
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Memoirs of the right honourable Edmund Burke; or, An impartial review of his ...

Charles M'Cormick - 1798 - 402 pages
...hearers, ftill went on refining, " And thought of convincing, while they thought of dining: " Tho' equal to all things, for all things unfit, " Too nice for a ftatefman, too proud for a wit ; " For a patriot too cool ; for a drudge, difobedient ; " And too fond...
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The Poems of Oliver Goldsmith

Oliver Goldsmith - English poetry - 1800 - 192 pages
...for his hearers, still went on refining, And thought of convincing, while they thought of dining ; Though equal to all things, for all things unfit;...to pursue the expedient. In short, 'twas his fate, unemploy'd, or in place, sir, To eat mutton cold, and cut blocks with a razor. Here lies honest Wjlliam,...
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The Life of Edmund Burke: Comprehending and Impartial Account of ..., Volume 2

Robert Bisset - 1800 - 488 pages
...convincing while they thought of dining j Tho. equal to all things, for all things rfnfit, Too n^ce for a statesman, too proud for a wit ; For a patriot too cool, fora drudge disobedient, And too fond of the right to pursue the expedient; In fine, .twas his fate,...
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Annual Register, Volume 17

History - 1801
...while they thought of dining ; Tho' equal to aU things, for all things unfit, Too nice for a ftntefman, too proud for a wit : For a patriot too cool ; for a drudge, difobedient, And too for.d of the right to purfue the ixptJitat. In (hört, 'twao his fate, uncmploy'd,...
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The Poetical Works of Oliver Goldsmith, M. B.: With an Account of His Life ...

Oliver Goldsmith - 1803 - 192 pages
...deep for his hearers, still went on refining, And thought of convincing, while they thought of dining; Though equal to all things, for all things unfit,...to pursue the expedient. In short 'twas his fate, unemploy'd, or in place, sir, To eat mutton cold, and cut blocks with a razor. Here lies honest William,f...
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The European Magazine: And London Review, Volume 44

1803
...another. Goldfmith, in his Retaliation, when charaiterifiug the celebrated Burke, fays : " In fliort, 'twas his fate, unemployed or in place, Sir, To eat mutton cold, and cut blocks loiib.a razor,'' In a collection of " Thoughts on various Subjects," publifhed both in tlie works of...
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The Poetical Works of Oliver Goldsmith: With an Account of His Life ...

Oliver Goldsmith - English poetry - 1805 - 148 pages
...deep for his hearers, still went on refining, And thought of convincing, while they thought of dining; Though equal to all things, for all things unfit; Too nice for a statesman, too proud for a wit ; ' Mr. T. Townshend, Member for Whitchurch. H For a patriot too cool ; for a drudge disobedient ;...
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Poetical Works

Oliver Goldsmith - 1806 - 248 pages
...his hearers, still went on refining, And thought of convincing, while they thought of dining ; Tho* equal to all things, for all .things unfit, Too nice...to pursue the expedient. In short, 'twas his fate, unemploy'd, or in place, sir, To eat mutton cold, and cut blocks with a razor. Here lies honest William,...
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Essay on Irish bulls, by R. L. and M. Edgeworth

Richard Lovell Edgeworth - Bulls, Colloquial - 1808 - 300 pages
...refining, And thought of convincing, whilst they thought of dining, In short 'twas his fate unernploy'd or in place, sir, To eat mutton cold, and cut blocks with a razor." " What humour and wit there are in that poem of Goldsmith's ! and where is there any thing...
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