The Evolution of Western Private Law

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JHU Press, 2001 - History - 320 pages
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In The Evolution of Western Private Law, renowned legal scholar Alan Watson presents a comprehensive overview of legal change in the Western world. Watson explains why and how such change occurs in mature systems, in underdeveloped systems, and when legal systems of different levels of sophistication and from different societal roots -- such as those of the Romans and of Germanic tribes -- come into contact.

Originally intended as a second edition of the author's widely acclaimed The Evolution of Law (1985), this expanded edition has been completely restructured with more than double the number of examples. The result is a work that incorporates all the ideas that Watson has put forward during his twenty-five years studying comparative law and the development of legal systems, combining a remarkable range of sources with superb insight.

-- Gerald J. Russello
 

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Contents

LEGISLATION I
19
JUDGES
54
CUSTOM
91
French Délit
113
The Cause of the Reception
193
Other Receptions
218
THE CASE OF ENGLISH COMMON LAW
234
HUMANISM THE LAW OF REASON
248
CONCLUSIONS
261
Notes
267
Glossary
311
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Alan Watson is the Ernest P. Rogers Professor and Distinguished Research Professor at the University of Georgia Law School. He is the author of Failures of the Legal Imagination, Slave Law in the Americas, International Law in Archaic Rome, and Roman Slave Law, the last two available from Johns Hopkins.

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