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XIV. "YOUNG ENGLAND" AND "CONINGSBY".

190

XV.

'SYBIL ".

218

XVI. THE CORN LAWS AND THE CONTEST WITH PEEL ...

234

XVII.

"TANCRED".

267

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IT is usual to draw a decided distinction between politicians and literary men. There seems to be a great gulf between the men of letters and the men of action. Every one can bring forward instances to show that distinguished savans, orators, poets, and professors have shown a want of common sense or political ability if they have left the paths of literature for the career of a statesman. We have often seen political theorists condemned to play but a subordinate part, or to exercise but a temporary influence, in the parliament of their country, and humanitarian poets, like Lamartine, who have wearied the national assembly with their lyrics, and whose political career has been confined to a single great moment. As a rule, then, eminent literary ability precludes political action, and, vice versa, political action suppresses the development of litera powers. Practical politicians, therefore, often

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