The Diplomatic Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being the Letters of Benjamin Franklin, Silas Deane, John Adams, John Jay, Arthur Lee, William Lee, Ralph Izard, Francis Dana, William Carmichael, Henry Laurens, John Laurens, M. de Lafayette, M. Dumas, and Others, Concerning the Foreign Relations of the United States During the Whole Revolution : Together with the Letters in Reply from the Secret Committee of Congress, and the Secretary of Foreign Affairs : Also, the Entire Correspondence of the French Ministers, Gerard and Luzerne, with Congress : Published Under the Direction of the President of the United States, from the Original Manuscripts in the Department of State, Conformably to a Resolution of Congress, of March 27th, 1818, Volume 8

Front Cover
N. Hale and Gray & Bowen, 1830 - United States
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 170 - DO, in the name and by the authority of the good people of these colonies, solemnly publish and declare, that these united colonies, are, and of right ought to be, free and independent states ; that they are absolved from all allegiance to the British crown, and that all political connexion between them and the state of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved...
Page 263 - I have received the letter, which you did me the honor to write to me the 4th instant, as also those which accompanied it.
Page 171 - The United States in Congress assembled shall have the sole and exclusive right and power of determining on peace and war...
Page 177 - And further, the committee beg leave to report it as their opinion, that these United States cannot, with propriety, hold any conference or treaty with any commissioners on the part of Great Britain, unless they shall, as a preliminary thereto, either withdraw their fleets and armies, or else, in positive and express terms, acknowledge the independence of the said states.
Page 175 - America, they could not send any members to confer with his lordship in their private characters, but that, ever desirous of establishing peace on reasonable terms, they would send a committee of their body to ascertain what authority he had to treat with persons authorized by Congress, and what propositions he had to offer.
Page 490 - ... before the declaration of war, or in the space of six months after it, which effects shall not be in any manner subject to confiscation, but shall be faithfully and without delay restored in nature to the owners, who shall claim them or cause them to be claimed, before the confiscation and sale, as also their proceeds, if the claim could not be made but in the space of eight months after the sale, which ought to be public : provided nevertheless, that if the said merchandises are contraband,...
Page 483 - In case the subjects and inhabitants of either party, with their shipping, whether public and of war, or private and of merchants, be forced through stress of weather, pursuit of pirates or enemies, or any other urgent necessity...
Page 53 - I shall not enter into an examination of the successive variations and augmentations of your demands on me for funds to meet your payments.
Page 235 - A minister plenipotentiary for negotiating a treaty of peace and a treaty of commerce with Great Britain.
Page 441 - Island, and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia, to be free, sovereign and independent States; that he treats with them as such, and for himself, his heirs and successors, relinquishes all claims to the Government, propriety and territorial rights of the same, and every part thereof.

Bibliographic information