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MEM AOKK

PROLOGUE.

As I purpose now to take my readers into closer communion than ever before, I feel like telling them how, I came to write this book; and, in a way, how I came to interest myself in the study of the possibilities of the human when acting under the laws, fixed and unalterable as I have found them, which govern human unfoldment.

During the summer and autumn of 1913, I was engaged on a very important business matter in London, and there met the editor and critic of a publishing house who asked me to write a new book for his house to publish and handle. I had never taken an order to write a book before, and told him I would consider the matter and bring him an answer in a few days. That very evening, when alone, I questioned myself on this subject, and if I could reply affirmatively, and soon the plan of the book appeared before me. I saw its scope and felt it would form a fitting sequel to what I had already written on lines embraced within the radius of modern practical psychology. I felt then, before I had commenced

the writing of it, that a system of drill or method of unfoldment of powers within the selfhood could be presented, which would be adapted to the thinking men and women of to-day, and aid some of them at least to perceive how to bring their own dormant powers to expression. In short, I became interested and absorbed in the completeness of what my subconscious self seemed to have in store and in waiting to be given out. And yet, I had not previously conceived of writing the book-the suggestion from this editor apparently came at the right time, and the unwritten "copy" was pressing me to put it into form. Before I saw him again the early chapters had been written, and I told him I could and would do the work he desired.

Now the manuscript is complete, and about to go to him, and this resolve to have a preliminary talk with my readers seems to me to be a part of the general plan. I believe each one will find by self-examination that he has reached or passed one or two points along the pathway of life when he began to review his accustomed lines of thought and to question the soundness of the conclusions reached. Upon reflection, he has found he had been following mental pathways, lines of thought that others constructed long ago-pathways and lines of which the builders left no record of their

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