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SIR,

No. 155.-Viscount Palmerston to Mr. Hudson. Foreign Office, January 23, 1851. I HAVE received and laid before the Queen your despatch of the 11th of November, 1850, inclosing a copy and translation of the new Law of Brazil for the suppression of the Slave Trade, which was passed on the 4th of September last; and a copy and translation of the Imperial Decree which was issued on the 14th of October, establishing regulations for carrying that law into effect.

I have now to instruct you to express to the Brazilian Government the great satisfaction which Her Majesty's Government have derived from a perusal of this Law and of these regulations, which seem well calculated to accomplish the purposes for which they are framed, if they shall be vigorously and invariably carried into execution.

You should also say to the Brazilian Government, that if these laws and regulations are efficiently enforced, and if, by means of such measures, the Brazilian Government shall, by its own action, set to work to put an end to the Slave Trade, Her Majesty's Government will with pleasure instruct Her Majesty's naval Commander on the coast of Brazil to act in co-operation with the measures adopted by the Brazilian Government. J. Hudson, Esq.

I am, &c.

PALMERSTON.

No. 163.-Mr. Hudson to Viscount Palmerston.-(Rec. Feb. 3, 1851.).
MY LORD,
Rio de Janeiro, December 17, 1850..

WITH reference to my despatch of the 11th of November, transmitting to your Lordship a copy of the Law of the 4th of September last, and of the regulations passed by the Brazilian Legislature against Slave Trade, I have now the honour to inclose herewith the copy of another decree which regulates the execution of parts of that law. I have, &c.

Viscount Palmerston, G.C.B.

SIR,

JAMES HUDSON.

No. 165.-Viscount Palmerston to Mr. Hudson.

Foreign Office, February 8, 1851. I HAVE to acquaint you that on the 6th of May, 1850, His Highness the Imaum of Muscat formally granted permission to Her Majesty's ships of war employed on the eastern coast of Africa in the suppression of the Slave Trade, to enter the creeks, rivers, ports, and bays between Cape Delgado and Sanga Manara, or Pagoda Point, in search of vessels engaged in the Slave Trade, and also to destroy all barracoons or establishments found erected within those limits for carrying on Slave Trade.

Cape Delgado, which is situated in about 10° 41' south latitude, is the point which separates His Highness' dominions on the east

coast of Africa, from the dominions of the Portuguese Crown upon that coast. Sanga Manara, or Pagoda Point, is apparently about 100 miles north-west of Cape Delgado.

In pursuance of the permission thus obtained from the Imaum, the boats of Her Majesty's ships Castor and Dee having proceeded in the month of May last on an inspection of the district referred to, discovered at a place called Masani, about 5 miles north-west of Cape Delgado, a complete slave-trading establishment, with barracoons and sheds adjoining, capable of containing upwards of 1,000 slaves, surrounded by the houses of the slave-traders. The whole of those buildings, with the property contained therein, were set fire to and totally destroyed. Early in the month of June, the boats of the same ships having proceeded to an inspection of the River Mozamba, in 10° 36′ south latitude, discovered at a village called Keonga, about 5 miles from the entrance of that river, another complete slave-trading establishment, consisting of barracoons capable of containing 4,000 slaves, stores, sheds, kraals, &c., and those buildings were likewise entirely destroyed, as well as a slave dhow measuring about 100 tons.

These slave-trading establishments are reported to have been in the habit of furnishing supplies of slaves, not only to the market of Zanzibar to the northward, but also to the Portuguese settlements to the southward, for exportation thence to Brazil; and I have the satisfaction of informing you that their destruction is represented as likely to prove a serious check to the Slave Trade on that part of the east coast of Africa.

I have to instruct you to communicate these facts to the Brazilian Government.

J. Hudson, Esq.

I am, &c.

PALMERSTON.

No. 166.—Mr. Hudson to Viscount Palmerston.-(Rec. March 10.) MY LORD, Rio de Janeiro, January 8, 1851. WITH reference to your Lordship's despatch of the 15th October last, instructing me to present to the Brazilian Government a note upon the subject of the piratical and murderous attack upon Her Majesty's ship Cormorant, by persons in possession of a fort belonging to the Emperor of Brazil at Paranaguá, I have the honour to transmit herewith to your Lordship the copy of a note which, in obedience to your Lordship's instructions, I have addressed to the Brazilian Minister for Foreign Affairs upon this subject.

Your Lordship will perceive, at the close of this note, that I have called the attention of Senhor Paulino to the departure from this port of the Sardinian galera Due Amici, commanded by a person named Frugoni, a notorious slave-dealer, who is strongly suspected of having headed those pirates and miscreants who gained possession

of the fort at Paranaguá, and turned its guns upon Her Majesty's ship Cormorant; and I have the honour to inclose the copy of a note which I addressed to Senhor Paulino upon the fact of the departure of that person from this port.

I have also the honour to report to your Lordship that the Due Amici is supposed not to have gone, as is reported, to Genoa, but to Bahia, where, if the occasion presents itself, she will fit out for Slave Trade, and thence proceed to Africa for a cargo of slaves.

Viscount Palmerston, G.C.B.

I have, &c.

JAMES HUDSON.

(Inclosure 1.)-Mr. Hudson to Senhor Paulino de Souza. EXCELLENT SIR, Rio de Janeiro, December 26, 1850. HAVING duly transmitted to the Government of the Queen a copy of the note which I addressed to your Excellency on the 12th of last July, upon the subject of an attack made by the fort of Paranaguá on Her Majesty's ship Cormorant, by which one seaman of Her Majesty's ship was killed and two wounded, I am now instructed to state to your Excellency the extreme displeasure and astonishment felt by Her Majesty's Government at learning the perpetration of this piratical and murderous attack upon one of Her Majesty's ships by persons in possession of a fort belonging to the Emperor of Brazil.

Her Majesty's Government sincerely hope that the result of the searching inquiry which the Imperial Government will no doubt have thought it to be their imperative duty immediately to institute, will prove that no persons holding a commission under or receiving pay from the Emperor, were concerned in committing this scandalous outrage; but that it was the act of a band of pirates who, having overpowered the military garrison, had taken possession of the fort for their iniquitous purpose.

Her Majesty's Government cannot entertain a doubt that the Brazilian Government will deem it essential for the honour of the Brazilian army to inquire whether the garrison of the fort made a proper resistance to the lawless violence of these pirates, or whether the fort was surrendered to those marauders through the want of courage, or through the criminal connivance of those officers and men to whom the Imperial Government had entrusted the safe keeping of it.

But this is an investigation which concerns only the honour and reputation of the Brazilian military service, and with which, therefore, the Brazilian Government alone is entitled to deal. But the fact that, by some means or other, a band of pirates succeeded in obtaining possession of a Brazilian fort, and turned the guns of that fort on a British ship of war, is a matter which Her Majesty's

Government cannot allow to pass without demanding the most ample redress.

That redress must consist in a formal communication from the Brazilian Government, expressing its deep regret that such an outrage should have been committed, and by the punishment of the pirates who have heen guilty of murdering one of Her Majesty's subjects and wounding two others.

Her Majesty's Government trust that the Brazilian Government will long since have taken the most active steps for bringing to adequate punishment all the parties who were concerned in this nefarious and disagreeable transaction.

Your Excellency, however, knows that no answer has yet been returned to the 2 notes which I have already addressed to you upon this grave matter; and I have therefore, for the third time, to call your Excellency's most serious attention to it, and to demand, in the name of my Government, that no further delay shall take place therein. I avail, &c.

Senhor de Souza.

JAMES HUDSON.

(Inclosure 2.)—Mr. Hudson to Senhor Paulino de Souza. EXCELLENT SIR,

Rio de Janeiro, December 16, 1850.

I HAVE the honour to inclose herewith a copy of the "Jornal do Commercio" of this day, in which, under the head of "Movimento do Porto," your Excellency will see that the Sardinian galera Due Amici, yesterday sailed hence for Genoa, having on board a man named Antonio Pasqual Frngoni, who, I am informed, is the same individual whom I long ago pointed out to your Excellency as the person who committed that atrocious act of piracy of firing upon Her Majesty's flag at Paranaguá.

I have therefore to request that your Excellency will state to me, for the information of my Government, what steps have been taken by the Imperial Government to examine into the facts of that case, and how it happens that the miscreant and slave-dealer, Frugoni, who is suspected of the high crime in question, has been permitted to leave this country.

I have also to point out to your Excellency that I have not yet received a reply to the note which I had the honour to address to your Excellency on the 14th of last July. Senhor de Souza.

I avail, &c.
JAMES HUDSON.

No. 171.—Mr. Hudson to Viscount Palmerston.-(Rec. March 10.)
MY LORD,
Rio de Janeiro, January 11, 1851.

As your Lordship's despatch of the 15th October points out some of the conditions upon which Her Majesty's Government would consent to conclude a Treaty for the suppression of Slave Trade,

I deemed it my duty to endeavour to effect with the Brazilian Government such a preliminary arrangement as would, while it assisted the suppression of Slave Trade in this country, facilitate the operations of Her Majesty's Naval Forces on this coast, and the negotiations for a definitive Treaty for the suppression of Slave Trade.

With this view I laid before Senhor Paulino the draft of a note, a copy of which I have the honour to inclose, in which your Lordship will perceive the terms upon which I proposed that the authorities of Brazil should co-operate with those of Her Majesty in the suppression of Slave Trade.

I presented this draft to Senhor Paulino on the 23rd ultimo, and his Excellency then saw no objection to it. On the 26th of the same month his Excellency altered his mind, and rejected it. At a further conference, on the 6th instant, his Excellency again accepted it; rejected it at noon yesterday, and at 7 o'clock in the evening of the same day he presented to me a modification of the terms contained in the draft of my note.

I have the honour to inclose a copy of the memorandum which Senhor Paulino presented to me on that occasion, from which your Lordship will perceive that no provision is made for the case of a refusal of co-operation on the part of the Brazilian authorities.

Upon my pointing this out to Senhor Paulino, his Excellency replied, "Oh! in that event you may take slave-ships on your own responsibility. You may do what you think proper in that case."

As the rejection of this important point was tantamount to a rejection of the whole, I returned to Senhor Paulino his memorandum, acquainting him that it was altogether inadmissible.

I have laid before the Rear-Admiral Commanding-in-chief the whole of my correspondence with the Brazilian Government upon this subject, and upon that of the discontinuance of the temporary suspension of his orders to capture slave-ships in Brazilian waters. I have, &c.

Viscount Palmerston, G.C.B.

JAMES HUDSON.

(Inclosure 1.)-Draft Note proposed to be addressed by Mr. Hudson to Senhor Paulino de Souza.

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THE Undersigned, &c., has the honour to request that his Excellency Senhor Paulino will state to him, for the information of the Government of the Queen, whether, in order to the more complete and effectual repression of the trade in African Slaves, there is any objection on the part of the Imperial Government to placing the Imperial forts on the same footing as the Imperial vessels of war; and that on the same principle on which when a slaver is to be

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