On the rights and duties of nations in time of war

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Retorsion
18
Reprisals
20
Embargo
21
Marque and Contremarque
23
The Admiralty Jurisdiction
27
Reprisals consistent with Peace
28
Negative and Positive Reprisals
29
Special and General Reprisals
30
Reprisals against the Two Sicilies in 1839
34
Reprisals not always lawful
35
Reprisals against PersonsThe Duc de Belleisle The Envoys of the Confederate States of America
39
Congress of Paris of 1856
41
CHAPTER II
43
Albericus Gentilis
48
War a necessary alternative
49
Lord Bacons view of War
51
Private Peace inconsistent with Public War
52
Lawful recourse to War
54
Offensive and Defensive War
56
Formal Declaration of WarLaw of Germanic Em pire in twelfth centuryLaw of Europe in four teenth century
59
COMMENCEMENT OF
60
Declaration and Proclamation of War by Heraldsat ArmsLast Declaration of War by a Heraldat Arms in 1657
62
Recall of Resident Envoys
64
Disuse of Formal Declarations of War
65
Object of Proclamations of War at home
68
Object of Manifestoes to Neutral Powers
70
Opinion of M de Hautefeuille and of Burlamaqui Practice of the United States of America
71
The Status ante bellum ambiguous
74
Unilateral Declaration of War sanctions reciprocal hostilities
75
Recall or Dismissal of Resident EnvoysIgnorance of hostilities on the part of Neutrals
76
Sect Page 42 Effect of War upon individuals
79
Naturalborn and adopted Citizens
82
Inhibition of intercourse with the EnemyRecall of naturalborn Subjects
83
Commissions to carry on hostilities
84
Enemysubjects within the Territory of a Belligerent
86
Sect Page Polish EnvoyQueen Elizabeth and the Hanse Towns 240
88
Obligation of good Faith
89
Ancient Practice of Provisional Embargo
92
Enemysubjects resident in the Territory of a Belli gerent
93
Enemysubjects in transitu Detention of British Subjects in France by the First Consul in 1803
95
Modern practice not to detain Enemysubjects
99
Debts due to Enemysubjects
100
Opinion of Mr Justice Story IOI 55 Chancellor KentVattelBynkershoek
104
Judgment of Lord Ellenborough in Wolff v Oxholm
106
Suspension of Commercial Contracts
109
Debts due by an EnemysovereignThe Silesian LoanThe RussianDutch Loan
112
Embargo of Enemyproperty afloat in the ports Belligerent
114
Commencement of War with Russia in 1854
116
Immovable property of Enemies in the Territory of a Belligerent
118
Usage of Europe in the sixteenth centuryAlbe ricus Gentilis 243
125
Immovable property of EnemysubjectsNational
126
Public EdificesThe Capitol at Washington
132
CHAPTER V
138
Practice of European Powers at the end of the six teenth century 247
144
The Admiralty Jurisdiction of NationsOrder
145
Sect Page
149
Sect Page
153
The French System of Ship and Cargo mutually
160
Enemy Character may attach to Places in the
164
Territorial Theory of Hübner Klüber and Martens
166
The Passport or SeaLetterAmbiguity of the Mer
175
cupation of an Enemy 326
176
Treaty of the Pyrenees 7 Nov 1659
184
CHAPTER VI
190
Limited operations of a Blockade
227
Effect of a Blockade on Licenses
228
Effect of Licenses on a Blockade
230
CHAPTER VII
233
of Contraband of War
235
Zouch on Fetial Law Queen Elizabeth and
240
Treaty of Whitehall in 1661Treaties of Breda and Madrid in 1677Treaty of St GermainenLaye of 1677
256
Treaty of Whitehall of 1689
259
Opinion of Sir Leoline Jenkins
261
Treaty of Utrecht of 1713
262
British TreatyEngagements
264
Concert of European Nations as to certain articles
267
Bynkershoeks view
268
Vattel
270
French Jurists
271
Practice of British Prize Courts
272
Difficulty of specifying articles conditionally Contra band
274
General doctrine of British Prize Tribunals
276
British Treaty with the United States in 1796
280
Right of PreemptionTreaty of Westminster of 1656 Treaty of Whitehall of 1661Treaty of Orebro of 1812
287
Belligerents may not interfere with Trade within
295
The Character of the produce of Landed Estates
320
Friendly Character may attach to Places in the oc cupation of an Ally
327
CHAPTER IX
329
Prize Courts
334
Jurisdiction of Courts to distribute Prize
336
Absolute Control of the Crown over all Captures
340
Recapture subject to the jus postliminii
341
Rule of TwentyFour hours Possession
343
Salvage on RecapturePractice of Great Britain and of the United States of America
345
Practice of France Spain Denmark Sweden and Holland
346
Insurable interest of British Captors
348
Ancient Practice as to Prisoners of War
350
Modern Cartels for the exchange of Prisoners
353
Ransom of Captures at Sea
356
Ransom Bills
357
Hostages
360
Modern Restraints upon Ransom
361
Joint Captures
364
Distribution of Prize amongst joint Captors
367
Condemnation of Prizes brought into the port of an Ally
369
ON PRIVATEERS
374
Declaration of the Congress of Paris of 1856
423
Sect Page
425
Views of Wolff and Vattel
429
Exceptional Status of the Merchant on the High Seas
436
The Passage of Belligerents through Neutral Ter
443
Right of a Neutral Power to exclude Privateers
451
CHAPTER XII
460
Trade unless interdicted not a violation of
477
Ancient jurisdiction exercised by Neutral Powers
484
A Neutral Power may claim a vessel captured
492
Page
511
Convention for the amelioration of the condition of
524
Additional Articles to the Convention signed at Geneva
536
Circular of the Swiss Federal Council 16 Dec 1868
548
Circular of the Swiss Federal Council 2 May 1870
555
Conferences of London 1871
561
Paris 1856 signed at London 13 March 1871
578
special Convention of 18 March 1856 signed
587
Vict ch 90
594
Index
609
Conflict of jurisdiction between a Neutral Admiralty
610

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 583 - Treaty for that purpose, and have named as their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say : Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, the...
Page 608 - An act to prevent the enlisting or engagement of His Majesty's subjects to serve in foreign service, and the fitting out or equipping, in His Majesty's dominions, vessels for warlike purposes, without His Majesty's license...
Page 164 - Blockades, in order to be binding, must be effective, that is to say, maintained by a force sufficient really to prevent access to the coast of the enemy.
Page 563 - Conférence, reconnaissent que c'est un principe essentiel du droit des gens qu'aucune Puissance ne peut se délier des engagements d'un Traité, ni en modifier les stipulations, qu'à la suite de l'assentiment des Parties Contractantes, au moyen d'une entente amicale.
Page 597 - State : or (3.) Equips any ship with intent or knowledge, or having 'reasonable cause to believe that the same shall or will be employed in the military or naval service of any foreign State at war with any friendly State...
Page 574 - that it is an essential principle of the law of nations that no power can liberate itself from the engagements of a treaty, nor modify the stipulations thereof, unless with the consent of the contracting powers by means of an amicable arrangement.
Page 583 - Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India; His Majesty the Emperor of Germany, King of Prussia; His Majesty the Emperor of Austria, King of Bohemia, &c., and Apostolic King of Hungary...
Page 519 - ... d'opinion qui peuvent faire naître des difficultés sérieuses et même des conflits; Qu'il ya avantage, par conséquent, à établir une doctrine uniforme sur un point aussi important; Que les plénipotentiaires, assemblés au Congrès de Paris, ne sauraient mieux répondre aux intentions dont leurs gouvernements sont animés qu'en cherchant à introduire dans les rapports internationaux des principes fixes à cet égard; Dûment autorisés, les susdits plénipotentiaires sont convenus de se...
Page 595 - ... 1. Any person who, being a British subject, within or without the dominions of her Majesty, has, without the license of Her Majesty, accepted or agreed to accept any commission or engagement in the military or naval service of any foreign state at war with any friendly state.
Page 595 - He shall be guilty of an offence against this Act, and shall be punishable by fine and imprisonment, or either of such punishments, at the discretion of the court before which the offender is convicted; and imprisonment, if awarded, may be either with or without hard labour.

Bibliographic information