Diaries and Correspondence of James Harris, First Earl of Malmesbury: Containing an Account of His Missions to the Courts of Madrid, Frederick the Great, Catherine the Second, and the Hague; and His Special Missions to Berlin, Brunswick, and the French Republic, Volume 1

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R. Bentley, 1844
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Page 291 - XI de son traité de commerce avec la Grande-Bretagne, en étendant ces obligations à toutes les puissances en guerre. 4. Que pour déterminer ce qui caractérise un port bloqué on n'accorde cette dénomination qu'à celui où il ya, par la disposition de la puissance qui l'attaque avec des vaisseaux arrêtés et suffisamment proches, un danger évident d'entrer.
Page i - Diary and Correspondence of James Harris, First Earl of Malmesbury; containing an account of his missions to the Courts of Madrid, Frederick the Great, Catherine the Second, and the Hague; and of his special missions to Berlin, Brunswick, and the French Republic. Edited by his Grandson, the third Earl.
Page 237 - Empress discoursed a long while the other day on the ancient Greeks ; of their alacrity and the superiority of their genius, and the same character being still extant in the modern ones ; and of the possibility of their again becoming the first people, if properly assisted and seconded.
Page 291 - Ils se réduisent aux points qui suivent : 1° Que les vaisseaux neutres puissent naviguer librement de port en port et sur les côtes des nations en guerre ; 2° Que les effets appartenant aux sujets desdites puissances en guerre soient libres sur les vaisseaux neutres, à l'exception des marchandises de contrebande ; 3°...
Page 142 - Proceeding on these grounds, he has, all along, been guided by his own judgment alone, without ever consulting any of his ministers or superior officers, not so much from the low opinion he entertains of their abilities, as from a conviction, from his own feelings, that if he employed them otherwise than as simple instruments, they would, in time, assume a will of their own, and, instead of remaining accessories, endeavour to become principals.
Page 306 - ... in the Archipelago by the Russian tribunal instituted for that purpose, and at which he frequently presided, on neutral ships. After proving in the clearest manner that they confiscated and condemned Turkish property wherever they found it, and the only prizes they made were such property on board neutral ships, he gave in the whole to Count Czernicheff, signifying that as a faithful and affectionate servant of the Empress he thought himself obliged to set before her eyes, that if she carried...
Page 142 - ... of his Ministers or Superior Officers ; not so much from the low opinion he entertains of their abilities, as from a conviction from his own feelings that if he employed them otherwise than as simple instruments they would, in time, assume a will of their own; and instead of remaining accessories endeavour to become principals. To persevere in this system it was necessary for him to divest himself of compassion and remorse, and of course of religion and morality.
Page 253 - Admitting what you say," replied she, "what right have I, after all, to interfere in a quarrel foreign to my own concerns, on a subject I am not supposed to understand, and with Courts at such a distance from me?
Page 53 - ... clear head — an excellent heart — the best of fathers and of masters — and, though despotic, not a tyrant ;'— but, on the other hand, obstinate, indolent, and absorbed from more important avocations by his passion for the chace. ' The Prince of Asturias' [the King deposed by Buonaparte] has a good heart and clear head, but, by a neglected education and a continued suite of childish amusements, neither the one nor the other does him credit. The Princess [afterwards Queen] is of an engaging,...
Page 306 - As soon as he read the declaration and saw the grounds on which the instructions were to be made, he collected the various sentences which had been pronounced last war in the Archipelago by the Russian tribunal instituted for that purpose, and at which he frequently presided, on neutral ships. After proving in the clearest manner that they confiscated and condemned Turkish property wherever they found it, and the only prizes they made were such property on board neutral ships, he gave in the whole...

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