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("I'll answer for the barque, in spite of Neptune! Remember that it bears a poet and his fortune.")-Piron, La Métromanie, act iv., sc. 2.

Κἀγὼ, νή Δί', εἰ Παρμενίων. (5ο would I too, indeed, if I were Parmenio).

ALEXANDER THE GREAT (356323 B.C.)-to Parmenio, when the latter advised accepting the brilliant offers of Darius after the battle of Issus, saying 'I should accept them if I were Alexander.' (Plutarch, Lives: Alexander, xxix).

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καθεύδειν αὐτὸν οὐκ ἐῴη τὸ τοῦ Μιλτιάδου τρόπαιον. (.. the trophy of Miltiades would not let him sleep).

THEMISTOCLES (514-449 B.C.)— when asked the cause of his reserve and his sleeplessness after Miltiades' victory at Marathon (490 B.C.) Καὶ μὴν μάλιστα ἡμεῖς ἐφικνούμεθα

τοῖς ἐγχειριδίοις τῶν πολεμίων. (And yet we generally reach our enemies with these little daggers).

KING AGIS (d. 239 B.C.)-replying to an Athenian who jeered at the small Spartan swords, saying that

the jugglers on the stage swallowed them with ease. (Plutarch, Lives: Lycurgus, xviii).

Καὶ ποῦ τότε ἤμην ἔγω; (And

where was I all the time?) LYSIMACHUS (c. 362-282 B.C.) -when Onesicritus was reading aloud to him the fourth book of his History of Alexander after Lysimachus had made himself king. (Plutarch, Lives: Alexander, xlvi). Καὶ σὺ, τέκνον ; (And thou, too, my son ?)

JULIUS CAESAR (100-44 B.C.)— Dying words, to Marcus Brutus, on his stabbing him in the Roman senate. (Suetonius, Twelve Caesars,

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PITTACUS (B.C. 652-569).-Diogenes Laertius, Lives: Pittacus, § 79).

Κάκιστον δὲ ἄρχοντα εἶναι τὸν ἄρχειν ἑαυτοῦ μὴ δυνάμενον. (The worst ruler is the man who cannot rule himself).

CATO MAJOR (234-149 B.C.) — (Plutarch, Apophthegmata Catonis, 8: the Latin original does not occur). Cf.: "Melior est longanimus robusto; et qui dominatur in animum suum, eo qui capit civitatem " (He that is slow to anger is better than the mighty; and he that ruleth his spirit than he that taketh a city).—Prov. xvi, 32. Καλὰ τὰ διδασκάλια παρὰ Θηβαίων

ἀπολαμβάνεις, μὴ βουλομένους αὐτοὺς μηδὲ εἰδότας μάχεσθαι διδάξας. (The Thebans pay you well for having taught them to fight, whether they would or no).

ANTALCIDAS (fl. 4th cent. B.C.)— when he saw King Agesilaus wounded, alluding to the latter having, by his frequent and longcontinued invasions of Boeotia, made the Thebans a match for the Spartans in the art of war. (Plutarch, Lives: Lycurgus, xiii). Κοινὰ τὰ φίλων. (Friends have all things in common).

BION (fl. c. 250 B.C.)-(Diogenes Laertius, Lives: Bion, § 53).

Κρείττον εἶναι τοῖς ποσὶν ὀλισθεῖν, ἢ τῇ γλώττῃ. (Better a slip of the feet than of the tongue). ZENO (d. c. 260 B.C.)-(Diogenes Laertius, Lives: Zeno, § 26).

Εμὲ Δημοσθένης, ἡ ῢς τὴν ̓Αθηνῶν. (To compare Demosthenes with me is like comparing a sow with Minerva).

DEMADES (d. 318 B.C.) an opponent of Demosthenes.(Plutarch, Lives: Demosthenes, xi).

Ἐμοῦ δὲ ἐρωτῶν βούλομαι μᾶλλον τοὺς ἀνθρώπους, διὰ τί ἀνδριὰς οὐ κεῖται Κάτωνος ἢ διὰ τί κεῖται. I would much rather that men should ask why I have no statue than why I have one).

CATO MAJOR (234-149 B.C.)— (Plutarch, Apophthegmata Catonis, 10; Lives: Cato Major, xix).

Ἐμοῦ μὲν, ὦ παῖ, τὴν σὴν μητέρα

γαμοῦντος οὐδὲ ὁ γείτων ᾔσθετο τοῖς δὲ σοῖς γάμοις καὶ βασιλεῖς καὶ δυνάσται συγχορηγοῦσιν. (My boy, when I married your mother not even our neighbours heard of it but kings and princes are contributing to your wedding).

DEMADES (d. 318 B.C.)-to his son Demeas, on the occasion of the latter's marriage.—(Plutarch, Lives: Phocion, xxx).

Ενταῦθά εἰσιν οἱ πολέμιοι. (Here

are the enemy!)

JULIUS CAESAR (100-44 B.C.)— to a man bearing the eagle and running away. Caesar seized him by the neck and turned him round saying as above.(Plutarch, Lives: Caesar, lii).

Εοικεν, ὦ ἄνδρες, ὅτε Δαρεῖον ἡμεῖς

ἐνικῶμεν ἐνταῦθά, έκει τις ἐν ̓Αρκαδία γεγονέναι μυομαχία. (It appears, my friends, that while we were conquering Darius here in Asia, there was a battle of mice across the seas in Arcadia.)

ALEXANDER THE GREAT (356323 B.C.)-referring to a battle

between Agis and Antipater (Plutarch, Lives: Agesilaus, xv). Εύρηκα, εὕρηκα. (I have found it, I have found it).

ARCHIMEDES (287-212 B.C.)-on discovering the law of specific gravity. (Vitruvius Pollio, De Architectura, ix, 3). Generally quoted as 'Eureka,' or, more correctly, 'Heureka.'

Ἡ τῶν ἐμῶν λόγων κοπὶς πάρεστιν. (Here comes the pruning-knife of my periods).

DEMOSTHENES (385-322 B.C.)-— when Phocion rose to speak used to whisper to his friends as above. (Plutarch, Lives: Phocion, v). Ηράκλεις, ὡς ψυχρὸν ὑμῶν τὸ Balavelov. (By Hercules, how cold this bath of yours is!) JUGURTHA (154-104 B.C.)—when thrust naked into a dungeon, his clothes having been torn off him. (Plutarch, Lives: Marius, xii). Cf. also Sallust Jugurtha, ch. cxxii. and Longfellow, Jugurtha.

Θαρρεῖ· τοιοῦτον ἐστι τῆς ἀρετῆς τὸ χρώμα. (Cheer up-that is the colour of virtue !) DIOGENES (B.C. 412-323)—on seeing a young man blush. (Diogenes Laertius, Lives: Diogenes, § 54). Ιθι, γενναῖε, τόλμα καὶ δέδιθι μηδὲν. Καίσαρα φέρεις καὶ τὴν Καίσαρος τύχην συμπλέουσαν. (Come, good sir, have courage and fear nothing you have Čaesar and Caesar's fortune on board with you).

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JULIUS CAESAR (100-44 B. C.)—to the frightened pilot on board a vessel going from Dyrrachium to Brundisium. (Plutarch, Lives: Caesar, xxxviii). Cf.:

"Je réponds de la barque, en dépit de Neptune!

Songe donc qu'elle porte un poëte et sa fortune!'

("I'll answer for the barque, in spite of Neptune!

Remember that it bears a poet and his fortune.")-Piron, La Métromanie, act iv., sc. 2.

Κἀγὼ, νή Δί', εἰ Παρμενίων. (5ο would I too, indeed, if I were Parmenio).

ALEXANDER THE GREAT (356323 B.C.)-to Parmenio, when the latter advised accepting the brilliant offers of Darius after the battle of Issus, saying 'I should accept them if I were Alexander.' (Plutarch, Lives: Alexander, xxix).

. . καθεύδειν αὐτὸν οὐκ ἐψη τὸ τοῦ Μιλτιάδου τρόπαιον. (.. the trophy of Miltiades would not let him sleep).

THEMISTOCLES (514-449 B.C.)— when asked the cause of his reserve and his sleeplessness after Miltiades' victory at Marathon (490 B.C.) Καὶ μὴν μάλιστα ἡμεῖς ἐφικνούμεθα

τοῖς ἐγχειριδίοις τῶν πολεμίων. (And yet we generally reach our enemies with these little daggers).

KING AGIS (d. 239 B.C.)-replying to an Athenian who jeered at the small Spartan swords, saying that the jugglers on the stage swallowed them with ease. (Plutarch, Lives: Lycurgus, xviii). Καὶ ποῦ τότε ἤμην ἔγω ;

(And

where was I all the time?) LYSIMACHUS (c. 362-282 B.C.) -when Onesicritus was reading aloud to him the fourth book of his History of Alexander after Lysimachus had made himself king. (Plutarch, Lives: Alexander, xlvi). Καὶ σὺ, τέκνον ; (And thou, too, my son ?)

JULIUS CAESAR (100-44 B.C.)— Dying words, to Marcus Brutus, on his stabbing him in the Roman senate. (Suetonius, Twelve Caesars,

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PITTACUS (B.C. 652-569).-Diogenes Laertius, Lives: Pittacus, § 79).

Κάκιστον δὲ ἄρχοντα εἶναι τὸν ἄρχειν ἑαυτοῦ μὴ δυνάμενον. (The worst ruler is the man who cannot rule himself).

CATO MAJOR (234-149 B.C.) — (Plutarch, Apophthegmata Catonis, 8: the Latin original does not occur). Cf.: "Melior est longanimus robusto; et qui dominatur in animum suum, eo qui capit civitatem " (He that is slow to anger is better than the mighty; and he that ruleth his spirit than he that taketh a city).—Prov. xvi, 32. Καλὰ τὰ διδασκάλια παρὰ Θηβαίων

ἀπολαμβάνεις, μὴ βουλομένους αὐτοὺς μηδὲ εἰδότας μάχεσθαι διδάξας. (The Thebans pay you well for having taught them to fight, whether they would or no).

ANTALCIDAS (fl. 4th cent. B.C.)— when he saw King Agesilaus wounded, alluding to the latter having, by his frequent and longcontinued invasions of Boeotia, made the Thebans a match for the Spartans in the art of war. (Plutarch, Lives: Lycurgus, xiii). Κοινὰ τὰ φίλων. (Friends have all things in common).

BION (fl. c. 250 B.C.)-(Diogenes Laertius, Lives: Bion, § 53).

Κρεῖττον εἶναι τοῖς ποσὶν ὀλισθεῖν, ἢ τῇ γλώττῃ. (Better a slip of the feet than of the tongue). ZENO (d. c. 260 B.C.)—(Diogenes Laertius, Lives: Zeno, § 26).

Λήγει μὲν ἀγὼν τῶν καλλίστων ἄθλων ταμίας, καιρὸς δὲ καλεῖ μηκέτι μέλλειν. (The play, that has dispensed fairest prizes, is over, and the time summons us from further tarrying).

DEMONAX (2nd century A.D.) Dying words (Lucian, Life of Demonax, 65).

See Acta est

fabula; Tirez le rideau &c.

Μάλλον διὰ τοὺς πολίτας πειθαρ χικοὺς γεγονότας. (Nay, rather in her citizens knowing how to obey).

KING THEOPOMPUS (A. 770-724 B.C.)-in reply to the remark that Sparta's safety lay in her kings knowing how to rule. (Plutarch,

Lives: Lycurgus, xxx).

Μεμαστίγωσο ἂν, εἰ μὴ ὠργιζόμην. (Had I not been angry, I should have beaten you).

PLATO (B. C. 428-347)-to a child. Similarly, when Xenocrates entered the room once, he asked him to beat the child, as he could not himself, because he was angry. αὐτὸν γὰρ μὴ δύνασθαι διὰ τὸ wpylobal. (Diogenes Laertius, Lives: Plato, § 39.)

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μέχρι τοῦ βωμοῦ φίλος εἶναι ([he said that] he was his friend as far as the altar).

PERICLES (470-429 B.C.)-when asked to bear false witness for someone (Plutarch, Apophthegmata: Pericles, iii,) Francis I (1494-1547) when writing to Henry VIII. of England, in 1534, used the words:

Je suis votre ami, mais jusqu'aux autels. (I am your friend, but only as far as the altars).

Henry had advised him to separate himself from the Church of Rome as he himself had just done. Cf.:

Well and wisely said the Greek,
Be thou faithful, but not fond;
To the altar's foot thy fellows seek,
The Furies wait beyond.

- R. W. Emerson, Quatrains, Pericles See Usque ad aras amicus.

My Barileve, (Be not a king).

AN OLD WOMAN-to Demetrius (337-283 B.C.), who replied to her entreaty for a hearing that he had no leisure to attend to her (Plutarch, Lives: Demetrius, xlii).

Μηδὲν ἄγαν· καιρῷ πάντα πρόσεστι καλά. (Nothing in excess : all good things depend on due proportion).

THALES (B.C. 636-546)-(Diogenes Laertius, Lives: Thales, $41; also attributed by him to Solon, Socrates, and Cleobulus). Usually quoted in the latin form of Terence: "Ne quid nimis."

Μηδέποτε εἰς τοῦτον ἐγὼ καθίσαιμι τὸν θρόνον, ἐν ᾧ πλέον οὐδὲν ἕξουσιν οἱ φίλοι παρ' ἐμοὶ τῶν aλorpiwv. (Never may I bear rule if my friends are to reap no more benefit from it than anyone else).

THEMISTOCLES (c. 533-c. 465 B.C.)-when told that he, if he were impartial, would make a very good governor of Athens (Plutarch, Lives: Aristides, ii).

Μιαρώτατε Κάσκα, τί ποιεῖς; (You villain, Casca, what are you doing?)

JULIUS CAESAR (100-44 B.C.)— when stabbed by Casca, who was followed by the other conspirators, Caesar is said to have received three and twenty wounds (Plutarch, Lives: Caesar, lxvi).

There is no Latin authority for the saying, though Plutarch states that it was said in Latin. Cf. :

"See, what a rent the envious Casca made:"-Shakspere, Julius Caesar, act iii, sc. 2.

Μικρὸν ἀπὸ τοῦ ἡλίου μετάστηθι. (Stand a little way out of my sunshine).

DIOGENES (A. B.C. 412-323)—to Alexander the Great, when invited

by him to ask a favour, which would be at once granted. (Plutarch Lives: Alexander, xiv,

Another version : ̓Αποσκότησόν μου.

(Stand out of my light).-Diogenes Laertius, Lives: Diogenes, 38.

Μισῶ σοφιστὴν ὅστις οὐχ αὑτῷ σοφός. (I hate a philosopher who is not wise in his own interest). ALEXANDER THE GREAT (356323 B.C.)-alluding to the behaviour of Kallisthenes in society. (Plutarch, Lives: Alexander, liii). A quotation from Euripides-Frag. ment 930.

Μόνον συνενέγκαι ταῦτα τῇ Σπάρτη. (I only pray that this may redound to the good of Sparta). AGESISTRATA, mother of King Agis, who had been hanged (399 B.C.), offering her neck to the halter. (Plutarch, Lives: Agis, xx).

τοῦτο τῇ Σπάρτῃ λῷόν ἐστι (.. this is best for Sparta). Words heard in a dream by an Ephor and communicated to Cleomenes (d. 220 B.C.) Referring to the removal of the Ephors (Plutarch, Lives: Cleomenes, vii). Kratesiclea, Cleomenes' mother, on hearing that Ptolemy, king of Egypt, had offered him assistance on condition of receiving her and his children as hostages, said:

Οὐ θᾶττον ἡμᾶς ἐνθέμενος εἰς πλοῖον ἀποστελεῖς ὁποῦ ποτὲ τῇ Σπάρτη νομίζεις τοῦτο τὸ σῶμα χρησιμώτατον ἔσεσθαι πρὶν ὑπὸ γήρως αὐτοῦ καθήμενον διαλυθῆναι.

(Will you not place us on board as soon as possible, and send us wherever this body of mine will be useful to Sparta, before it be consumed by old age after remaining idle at home) (Plutarch, Lives: Cleomenes, xxii).

Galba's litter was overturned near the Lake of Curtius, and, as he fell to the ground, many ran and stabbed

him.

He, offering his throat to them, said :

Δρᾶτε εἰ τοῦτο τῷ δήμῳ Ρωμαίων ἄμεινόν ἐστι.

(Do it, if it be best for the Roman people). See Puisse mon sang &c. Ναὶ μὲ τὸν Δία, σκέπτομαι εἴ τι δύναμαι τοῦ λόγου ἀφελεῖν δν μέλλω λέγειν πρὸς τοὺς 'Aonválovs. (Yes, indeed, I am considering whether I can shorten the speech which I am about to deliver to the Athenians).

PHOCION (C. 400-318 B.C.)-on his friends remarking that he seemed thoughtful (Plutarch, Lives: Phocion, v).

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Cf. "Je n'ai fait celle-ci plus longue que parce que je n'ai pas eu le loisir de la "faire plus courte." (I have only made this [letter] longer because I have not had the leisure to make it shorter).-B. Pascal, Lettres Provinciales, letter 16 (near end).

νεκρὸς οὐ δάκνει ( . . a dead man does not bite).

THEODOTUS CHIUS-(Plutarch, Lives: Pompeius, lxxvii). Another version is : Οἱ τεθνηκότες οὐ δάκνουσιν (Dead men do not bite)-Erasmus, Chiliades adagiorum, "Obtrectatio." Νικᾷς, ὦ Καίσαρ (Thou conquerest, Cæsar).

CAIUS CORNELIUS (fl. 1st cent. B.C.)-reputed to be skilled in divination, watching the birds in Patavium, while the battle of Pharsalia (48 B.C.) was going on. Observing the signs he called out as above (Plutarch, Lives: Cornelius, xlvii).

Ο ἂν αὐτῶν ποιήσῃς, μεταγνώσῃ. (Whichever you do, you will repent).

SOCRATES (B.C. 468-399)—when asked whether it was best to marry or not (Diogenes Laertius, Lives: Socrates, $33). See Τοὺς μὲν νέους

μηδέποτε, τοὺς δὲ πρεσβυτέρους μηδεπώποτε.

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