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was for parliament to give the subject the fullest inquiry, but he trusted that the hon. mover would in the first instance, without any subsequent restriction, direct his proofs to the specific objects on which his charges of that night were founded.

Mr. WHITBREAD concurred heartily in the recommendation of the Chancellor of the Exchequer for the most public inquiry. It was due to the elevated rank of the illustrious personage accused, and to the great interests of the country, which were so implicated in the issue. The right hon. Secretary had assumed as a fact, that such a conspiracy as he described, existed, and upon that assumption he rested all his arguments. If such a conspiracy did exist, every man must lament, that such a character, elevated in rank and influence, should be exposed to unmerited calumny.-Still it was to be presumed and hoped, that a prince of the house of Hanover would prefer even suffering under such attacks, rather than risque the liberty of that Press to which that family and the British empire owed so much. But why was this brutality of insult so long suffered to continue? Were the Attorney and Solicitor Generals asleep, and the other law officers of the crown asleep? How came it that they neglected their duty? He was ready to give them credit that the omission was not intentional. (A laugh.) There was one point in the speech of the right hon. Secretary from which he must dissent. It was assumed by him, that if the result should, as he trusted, acquit his royal highness, his hon. friend would be infamous for preferring the accusation. Such doctrine was not supported either by the spirit or usage of the constitution. If there were justifiable grounds for his charge, or if information of a strong kind was laid before him, it was his bounden duty, as an honest public servant, to act upon it in that house. In compliance with that sense of duty, his hon. friend did submit the subject to the House, and whatever might be the issue, he was convinced that not a particle of dishonour could attach to him (Mr. Wardle). There was one strong reason that it should go to a Committee of the House, which weighed particularly with himnamely, that it would be impossible to select any set of names that would satisfy this herd of libellers and calumniators, of which such mention had been made by the right hon. Secretary.

Lord CASTLEREAGH Supported the opinion, that such a CONSPIRACY did exist, with the determined object of running down the characters of the princes of the blood, and through them to destroy the monarchical branch of the constitution. Having failed in the attempt to injure it by open force, they now proceeded to sap and undermine it by the diffusion of seditious libels, converting the noble attributes of a free press to the most dangerous and detestable purposes. H. r. h. the Commander in Chief was the principal object of their rancorous invective. To his prejudice facts were falsified, and motives attributed to him of which his very nature was incapable. As to the observation of the hon. gent. that the crown lawyers had not done their duty in not prosecuting libellers, he had only to say, that it was not always easy to convict upon an obvious libel, as a very small portion of legal knowledge united with some ingenuity, would be sufficient to defeat a prosecution. When forbearance was stretched to its utmost point, and prosecutions were commenced, the base libellers were found to have absconded. Scarce had the calumny of one of them proceeded from the press, when the calumniator was found to have withdrawn himself to America (hear! hear!). The motion of that night put the duke of York and the public in a new situation. It gave the subject a distinct turn, and he knew that that elevated personage would deprecate any proceeding that did not rest upon steps taken in the face of day.

After a few observations from Mr. Wardle, it was resolved that the House should on Wednesday next resolve itself into that Committee.

The CHANCELLOR of the EXCHEQUER then proposed, that the hon. gentleman should give in a list of the names of those witnesses he intended to call to substantiate his charge, that such persons might be summoned to attend at the bar of the House on Wednesday next.

Mr. WARDLE (after having gone to the table to make out his list of witnesses, returned to his seat) and said, that he thought it would be attended with no in convenience to defer mentioning the wit nesses till Tuesday, when he should come down to the House prepared to furnish the House with the first part of the case he should proceed to prove, and a list of the witnesses whom it might be necessary to examine relative to that first charge.

SPANISH REVOLUTION. Palafox's Dispatch to the Central Junta.-Dec. 3, 1808.-(continued from page 127.) It was apprehended that, at this moment, they were proceeding to make an attack, with the whole of their force, in the direction of Casa Blanca; and such was the opinion of the troops stationed at that point, who, more cool and steady than even during any other part of the day, kept up their fire in the olive plantation through which the enemy were retreating, being, at the same time, on their guard lest it should prove a false retreat. But at four o'clock in the afternoon, the enemy filed off in the direction of Alagon, precipitately quitting the field of battle, and leaving behind a considerable quantity of provisions, some baggage, a number of musket locks, and various other articles of military stores. They sustained a considerable loss of men. On our side, we had only one killed, and a few wounded. All the troops and officers conducted themselves with gallantry and soldier-like intrepidity; and particularly general Don Felipe de Saint March, who upon this occasion displayed his military talents, and his characteristic judgment in the dispositions which he made to ensure the success of the action. The peasantry generously offered him their services, and are entitled to the highest praise, for the gallantry with which they saved themselves from a corps of cavalry that had surrounded them, killing one of the enemy's horse, and cutting their way through their troops. The division that was advancing by Zuera retreated before dark towards Tauste, where they arrived at dusk yesterday evening, traversing several rugged mountains and marching nine leagues in the course of the night and day. It is known that another division, of from eight to ten thousand men, who were, doubtless, coming to reinforce the army that attacked this city, passed yesterday though Alsamen, and are to join it on the other side of Alagon. This is all that I can at present communicate to your majesty. Palafox's Proclamation to the Arragonese. Dec. 3, 1808.

THE Country demands great sacrifices She calls us to her assistance; she sees no other defenders but her children; we are her only support. We should violate our duty to her, and to ourselves, did we not

employ our arms and risk our lives and property, in order to save her. Noble Arragonese! brave soldiers! ever ready to shed your blood to defend her and your King, it is unnecessary for me to remind you of sacred duties which you have never forgotten, but the important charge which you have confided to me, and my anxious desires to fulfil my duty, and to make a just return to your attachment, do not permit me to leave unemployed any means that may contribute to deliver you from those perfidious wretches who, already setting themselves in opposition to our determinations, already indifferent to the grand cause which we are defending, give utterance to sentiments little conformable to our tried loyalty. I therefore ordain and command:-1. That all the inhabitants of this city, of every rank and condition, shall consider themselves bound to devote to its defence their persons, property, and lives: the rich and great lending a helping hand to the poor, fostering, and assisting them, contributing to cover their nakedness, and to enable them to maintain their respective posts; thus performing a sacred duty, enjoined by natural affection, and recommended by the holy religion which we profess; and, at the same time, remunerating them for the zeal with which they defend their lives, their estates, and their common country. Should any man be so unnatural as to disown their obligation, he shall be fined in proportion to the magnitude of his offence, and the amount of the fine shall be appropriated to the subsistance of the army.

(To be continued.)

COBBETT'S

COMPLETE COLLECTION OF

State Trials:

To be completed in Thirty-Six Monthly Parts, forming Twelve large Volumes in Royal Octavo.

The THIRD PART of the above Work will be published on Wednesday, the first of March. One Part will appear, with the greatest regularity, on the first of each succeeding Month. Those Subscribers who have expressed their intention of taking the Work in Quarterly Volumes, are respectfully informed that the First Volume will be ready for delivery on the same day.

LONDON: Printed by T. C. HANSARD, Peterborough Court, Fleet Street; Published by R. BAGSHAW, Brydges-Street, Covent-Garden: Sold also by J. BUDD, Pall-Mall.

VOL. XV. No. 8.] LONDON, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1809.

[Price 10d.

ANNE, BARONESS GRENVILLE, wife of Lord Grenville, has, for life, a Pension of 1,500 pounds a year, to commence from the Death of Lord Grenville.

LADY LOUISA PAGET, a daughter of the Earl of Uxbridge, has now a Pension of 300 pounds a year, which pension sbe has had, since the year 1801.

THE MARCHIONESS OF STAFFORD had, until January 1807, a Pension of 300 pounds a year. Whether it has since been resigned does not appear.

CHARLES ABBOT, Esq. Speaker of the House of Commons, besides his salary and house, as Speaker, the salary being 6,000 pounds a year, holds the sinecure place of Keeper of the Signet in Ireland, the annual value of which place is 1,500 pounds a year, and which place he has for life.

In the Account of Places and Pensions, laid before Parliament in June last, it is stated, that, in the year ending on the 8th of April, 1808, the sum of 4,271 pounds was paid to Servants of the late Queen. Caroline, and the late Princess of Wales; that is to say, to Servants of the present King's Grandmother. and Mother. In this sum is included 181. 3s. 8d. annually paid, even last year, to an alms-house in Hamster.

The same Account exhibits a charge of 200 pounds a year, paid to Ministers at Amsterdam and Rotterdana, and this is stated as actually paid up to 5th January, 1807, without any notification that the payment is to be discontinued.

257]

"Let those think now, who never thought before,
"And those who always thought, now think the more."

DUKE OF YORK.

Pore.

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and inspection of the public, seems to me (Continued from page 252.) to be likely greatly to further the cause IN my last, I stated very fully the rea- of truth; and, indeed, to be absolutely sons why the people should, as to public necessary to the forming of a right conmatters, fix their attention solely upon clusion.Considering the mass of Eviwhat was going on in the House of Com- dence that lies before me, I am not unmons; and, I endeavoured to point out to aware of the arduousnes of this task, to them the way, in which they ought to ap- be performed by one person, in a space ply the facts that came to light; the way, of time necessarily so short; but, there in which they ought to trace the corrup- are few things of this sort that any man of tions to the injury of themselves and fa- common capacity cannot accomplish, if he milies. It now becomes necessary to set resolutely about it; and, at any rate, give an Analysis of the Examinations seeing how large a portion of the public which have been published; for, though attention I have, for so long a time, enthey have all been read, with great avidi-joyed, it is a duty which I owe that pubty, in the daily papers, which papers have discovered, upon this occasion, wonderful capacity, and a very laudable zeal for affording that " publicity," which appeared to be so anxiously desired by the friends of the Duke of York; though the examinations have all been read, in that shape, day after day, the interesting facts contained in them must, in the mind of every reader, as they do in mine, lie in a confused state; because, it has necessarily happened, that the cases have not been kept distinct; evidence relating to one case has been brought out during the examination into another case; the cases have, in fact, run into one another, like the branches of plants too luxuriant for their space. To separate them, therefore,

to draw to the stem of each its own branches, so that every individual case may stand clearly exposed to the view

lic to make the attempt.It is necessary further to premise, that this analysis will extend no further than the examinations of Friday, the 17th instant, inclusive," that being the period to which I am in possession of the Evidence. It is possible, that, at a later date, fresh examinations may take place, touching cases, whereon it now appears the evidence is closed. If that should happen, and if any new facts, at all material, should transpire, I shall hereafter notice them, making at the same time, reference to the case, or cases, upon which they bear.No desire was ever more clearly, or more strongly expressed, than the desire on the part of the Duke of York, that publicity should be given to all these proceedings; and, so entirely do I' agree in that wish, that, before I have done with the subject, my intention is, not only to communicate every fact of importance

to the public, but also, to furnish a Table of Contents, and a complete Index, to the whole; so that, with the least possible difficulty, the reader may, at any moment, refer to any part, whether of the Evidence, the Debates, or the Comments. This is not a matter that ought to pass away like a summer's cloud; it is not, and it ought not to be, the subject of a nine day's wonder; it is an event, which, sooner or later, must lead to great consequences; it will, in short, form an epoch in the History of this nation; therefore, it ought to be put upon record with fidelity and clearness, in every publication wherein the mention of it shall find a place, and especially in a work professing to be a Political Register. -As to the manner of the Analysis, upon which I am about to enter, I shall endeavour to follow, as nearly as I am able, the example of an impartial judge, when he is what is commonly called summing up the evidence upon a trial; and, if I do strictly adhere to this most excellent example, neither party can possibly have reason to complain.I shall not confine myself to such cases as are merely of a military nature; for, though Mr. Wardie's Charges were so confined, other matters have came out, and, in all, the people are interested full as deeply as if they were matters solely connected with the office of the Commander in Chief. The first head, therefore, under which I shall enter upon this Analysis, is that of

THE ADULTROUS INTERCOURSE.

The existence of this Intercourse has not been attempted to be denied. Indeed, the whole proceeding is founded on the admission of it. But, though those who have taken the part of the Duke of York; though both sides of the House of Commons seem to give up his moral character, as far, at least, as relates to his conjugal obligations, it will be right for us to draw to a point those parts of the Evidence, which establish the fact of this Adultrous Intercourse.- -First, then, Mrs. Clarke states, that she lived in the house in Gloucester Place, under the protection of the Duke of York; that he took the house in order to keep her there; that he made her a pecuniary annual allowance; that he bought her furniture and jewels; that he cat, drank, and lived with her. -The Duke's own servant, Ludovick, states, that he was the person who attended his master at Mrs. Clarke's; that his master was frequently there, and that it was part of his employment to carry his master's clothes

in the morning. Three servants of Mrs. Clarke state, that they saw the Duke there constantly; that they saw him at table with their mistress; and, at last comes Mrs. Favourite, Mrs. Clarke's housekeeper, who, in speaking of one particular transaction, states that she saw the Duke and Mrs Clarke in bed together.—Mr. Adam states, that Mrs. Clarke was under the protection of the Duke; that a separation took place upon his advice; and that upon this separation, he (Mr. Adam) was, upon that occasion authorized by the Duke, to tell her that he thought it his duty to give her an annuity of £.400 a year, provided her conduct should be correct. Lastly, we have the written evidence of the Duke himself, who in the following two Letters, addressed to Mrs. Clarke, and which Letters have been proved to be in his handwriting, enables us to form an unerring judgment as to the nature of the connec tion which existed between him and Mrs. Clarke.

August 4, 1805.-How can I sufficiciently express to My Sweetest, My Darling Love, the delight which her "dear, her pretty letter gave me, or how "much I feel all the kind things she says "to me in it? Millions and millions of "thanks for it, My Angel! and Be as"sured that my heart is fully sensible of 66 your affection, and that upon it alone its "whole happiness depends.-I am, however, quite hurt that My Love did not

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go to the Lewes Races; how kind of "her to think of me upon the occasion; "but I trust that she knows me too well "not to be convinced that, I cannot bear "the idea of adding to those sacrifices "which I am but too sensible that she "has made to me.-News, My Angel "cannot expect from me from hence; though the life led here, at least in the family I am in, is very hurrying, there "is a sameness in it which affords little subject for a letter; except Lord Ches"terfield's family, there is not a single

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person except ourselves that I know. "Last night we were at the Play, which "went off better than the first night.-Dr. "O'Meara called upon me yesterday

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morning, and delivered me your letter; "he wishes much to preach before Roy"alty, and if I can put him in the way "it I will.-What a time it appears to me already, My Darling, since we parted; "how impatiently I look forward to next Wednesday se'nnight!-God bless you, my own Dear, Dear Love! I shall miss

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the Post if I add more; Oh believe me 66 ever, to my last hour, Your's and Your's " alone."

Addressed: "Mrs. Clarke, to be left " at the Post-office, Worthing."

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-All that it is necessary to add to this evidence is, a statement of the well known facts, that the Duchess of York is living, that she is in England, and that there never has been any legal separation between her and her husband.

THE ANNUITY.

Sandgate, Aug. 24, 1804.-How can "I sufficiently express to My Darling Love my thanks for her dear, dear lctter, or the delight which the assurances Contracts, with whomsoever made, are of her love give me? Oh, My Angel! binding upon the parties. To break a 'do me justice and be convinced that promise is a breach of moral duty; and, there never was a Woman adored as therefore, it becomes us to ascertain, as 'you are. Every day, every hour con- nearly as we can, the truth, with respect vinces me more and more, that my to the Annuity, which Mrs. Clarke was to whole happiness depends upon you alone. receive, as the cast-off concubine of the What a time it appears to be since we Duke of York. She herself has stated, parted, and with what impatience do I that Mr. Adam, in the name of the Duke, look forward to the day after to-morrow; promised her an Annuity of £.400 a year. "there are still however two whole Nights In one instance she says, that Mr. Adam "before I shall clasp My Darling in my guaranteed the payment of this annuity. arms!-How happy am I to learn that She complains, that for more than a year you are better; I still however will not and a half it has not been paid; and, give up my hopes of the cause of your upon this non-payment we see that she feeling uncomfortable. Clavering is grounds all her disclosures against the mistaken, My Angel, in thinking that Duke of York. She states, besides, that any new regiments are to be raised; it she was left, upwards of two thousand "is not intended, only second Battalions pounds in debt to divers trades-people; to the existing Corps; you had better, and that, having since sent a remonstrance therefore, tell him so, and that you were to the Duke upon the subject, the Duke sure that there would be no use in apply-insisted that she should plead her marriage ing for him.--Ten thousand thanks, My to avoid her debts, or that she might, if she Love, for the handkerchiefs, which are liked, go to prison. She further states, delightful; and I need not, I trust, as-that having sent the Duke a letter, not sure you of the pleasure I feel in wear-long since, by one Taylor, a shoe-maker ing them, and thinking of the dear hands in Bond Street, requesting a few hundred who made them for me.-Nothing could pounds, he sent for answer, by the mouth 'be more satisfactory than the tour I of this same Taylor, that if she dared have made, and the state in which I speak against him, or write against him, "have found every thing. The whole of he would put her in the pillory or the Bas the day before yesterday was employed tile. The reader will bear in mind, that "in visiting the Works at Dover; review- this fact rests solely upon Mrs. Clarke's "ing the Troops there, and examining evidence; but he will also bear in mind, "the Coast as far as this place. From that, if false, it might have been easily disFolkstone I had a very good view of those proved by Taylor, the bearer of the mes"of the French Camp.-Yesterday I first sage, and that Taylor was not called to disreviewed the Camp here, and afterwards prove it; and he will further bear in mind, "the 14th Light Dragoons, who are cer- that this threat, if he should conclude that tainly in very fine order; and from it actually was made, was made against thence proceeded to Brabourne Lees, to that very person, to whom the Duke had see four regiments of Militia; which, written the two letters above inserted.altogether, took me up near 13 hours. But now, as to whether the annuity was "I am now setting off immediately to actually promised, or, if upon conditions, "ride along the coast to Hastings, review- whether the breach of those conditions "ing the different Corps as I pass, which justified the non-performance of the pro"will take me at least as long. Adieu, mise.Mr. Adam's words, as to the therefore, My Sweetest, Dearest Love, promise, are these: "I told her, that the "till the day after to-morrow, and be as- "Duke of York thought it his duty, if her "sured that to my last hour I shall ever "conduct was correct, to give her an annui"remain Yours and Yours alone." "ty of £.400 a year, to be paid quarterly; "that he would enter into no obligation in "writing, by bond or otherwise; that it

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