British Guiana Boundary: v. 2, 1724-1763; v. 3, 1763-1768; v. 4, 1769-1781; v. 5, 1781-1814; v. 6, 1815-1892; v. 7 [Miscellaneous

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Printed at the Foreign office, by Harrison and sons, 1898 - Guyana
 

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Page 46 - ... from the situation of their affairs shall see fit: Moreover, they must advance the peopling of those fruitful and unsettled parts, and do all that the service of those countries, and the profit and increase of trade shall require: and the Company shall successively communicate and transmit to us such contracts and alliances as they shall have made with the aforesaid princes and nations; and likewise the situation of the fortresses, fortifications, and settlements by them taken.
Page 45 - Netherlands, with the exclusive privilege to traffic and plant colonies on the coast of Africa from the Tropic of Cancer to the Cape of Good Hope ; on the coast of America, from the straits of Magellan to the remotest north.
Page 7 - ... clutches. Well the poor man reflects within himself. At this rate says he when shall I maintain my own family. I have a wife and a parcel of small children suffering at home and I have none to labour but myself, and here I have lost a month's work and I do not know for what, my merchant not yet paid, I do not know what will be the end of these things; however, I will go home, and try what I can do towards getting a living. Stay neighbour, you must not go home, you are not half done yet, there...
Page 131 - Essequibo, the Committee's opinion is that now for some time it has been traded to with small profit to the Company, for the reason that private colonists are permitted to trade there...
Page 46 - ... aforesaid Company shall be permitted to make in our name and authority, within the limits set forth above, contracts, leagues, and alliances with the Princes and natives of the lands therein comprised ; they may also build there some fortresses and strongholds, appoint Governors, soldiers, and officers of justice, and do everything necessary for the preservation of the places and the maintenance of good order, police, and justice...
Page 12 - Monies, as may more particularly be seen from the documents of proofs in possession of the Governor Francisco de "Vides, &c. As it appears to me to be of the utmost importance to your Majesty's service that the bank of the Orinoco be settled, I have considered it well to push that matter forward, and in like manner the navigation of the Orinoco, on account of the...
Page 151 - Charter, was empowered, a.id still is empowered, to establish colonies and settlements of people on lands which are not occupied by others, to extend themselves so far as the limits hereinbefore related, and especially since the same is necessary for preservation of the right which is due to them, by virtue of the aforewritten Charter, by discovery and...
Page 136 - ... Carthagena, Portobello, Honduras, Campeche, the Gulf of Mexico, and the coasts of Florida, as well as between and around all the islands situated in those parts, including even Curagoa, Buenayre, and Aruba, without permission to go east along the Wild Coast, much less to the Amazon or the Maransan [sic], or further north than Cape Florida, and equally without permission to come on any account whatever, or in any manner to the Virginias, New Netherlands, Nova Francia, and other places situated...
Page 9 - ... called Orinoco, the largest and most important, and the most frequented, of all the others. And on the banks of all these mouths mentioned an immense number of natives of two great nations, known as the Chaguanes and Tivitives, dwell. The land, however, is subject to inundations, and is marshy. Entering by any of the above-mentioned mouths, and going up the River Orinoco in the direction of the new Kingdom of Granada, various territories of divers nations of natives are met with, such as the...
Page 186 - •'as Postholder in place of Daniel Galle, who is going home, shall occasionally visit those places and encourage the Caribs to trade in annatto and letter-wood, which the French even from the islands in the river frequently come with their vessels to fetch. I submit, therefore, under correction, that it would not be inequitable for the Honourable West India Company to take possession of the River Barima in order to acquire the trade aforesaid, and to command the erection there of a permanent place...

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